Discussing our history and community context is essential to create engaged and informed citizens.


We are all struggling with race. We are all operating in a racist society. Unless we talk about it, we can't fix it.


How much do I push back on this student, knowing my own opinion and biases will come into play?


Teaching is inherently political. We ask our students to think critically, to question existing systems, to imagine what might be better.


Where we live not only affects culture and values but is also an instant determining factor in our access to nearly every resource and aspect of education.


What is the line between preparing kids for the real world and unnecessarily shattering their innocence? Does that line even really exist?


As the quarter winds down for many of us, it is easy to get weary. I know I've been personally struggling with burn out this year, and this is a prime time for teachers to start feeling the wear and tear of DEVOLSON (aka "the disillusionment phase"). The day-to-day of the job begins to slowly grind away at us, and it's easy to begin wondering how much longer we can stay invested in work that is, at times, emotionally taxing. There are a few things I'm trying to do this year to avoid burn-out-- self-reflect, take time for myself, etc. ...


Guest post by Helena Huffman I am a Female. I was born with 2 X chromosomes. I am 110 pounds of pure ambition and 5 pounds of sugar, spice and everything nice. I no longer allow society and their standards to control my appearance in exchange for killing my drive in life. When I think "female," I think of women who have changed the world with their intelligence and grace. Women who showed their strength and were not afraid of their kind hearts. I remember the first time I became a female. It wasn't the moment I put on a ...


To be a woman in "Trump's America," is actually realizing that a culture that has commodified your body now has a megaphone headed towards the throne.


You can never view yourself completely unbiased, and you can never view your culture or way of life completely unbiased. If you learn about other cultures, you might learn about the flaws in yours and try to help yourself and others around you and improve in a people as a whole.


The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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