« The False Notion of 'History' as Past | Main | Honesty in the Fight: What 'Game of Thrones' Teaches Us About Education Discussions »

Open The Doors: Resources for the New School Year

For some of us, we're already heading back into our classrooms, flicking on the lights, and letting the world come in. We move the chairs away from their comfortable positions on desks, wipe the dust around them, and start imagining what bulletin boards we need to put up or what supplies we need to get. 

As we begin to prepare, it's important to try and prepare our curriculums for students who must meet the world ahead. Here's a list of some tools that could help: 

It's easy to want to fall into the routine or the comfortable in times of distress or uncertainty. We are tempted to fall back on the tricks we know, to move forward and find some consistency in the controlled environment of our own classrooms.

Sadly, the world our students face outside the classroom is not so controlled, not so well-decorated and, sadly, not as safe. Just as we must open the doors of our classrooms, sweeping away cobwebs and turning on the lights for the first time in months, we must open the doors of our practice, our minds, and our students' minds and hearts as well.

So, even when it's hard, open the door and let the light shine in. As jarring as it can be, light is always better than the darkness of ignorance. 

IMG_4439.JPG

Photo by the author.


Find Christina online:
twitter.jpg : @biblio_phile
fb.jpg : /christinawrites
globe.png : http://christinatorres.org
 
 

Notice: We recently upgraded our comments. (Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post comments. If you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here.
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments