If we want to work towards true inclusivity, we must show that perpetuating oppressive beliefs, intentional or not, has a consequence on something or someone other than those oppressed.


We need to have difficult conversations, and we need to make sure we consider whose voices we center on as we have them.


This ability to all see each other, to all stand together as partners, is what makes a school. After all, what is a school but the people who work and learn there?


So, how do we manage? What do we do when consistently engaging in the difficult discussion about rape culture is hard on our hearts, but helpful for our students?


Serena Williams's reaction and its consequences is an unfortunate reflection of our school systems. Real life is hard. It's maddening. It's even harder and maddening when you're a young person of color growing up in a system built to watch you fail.


Kids have a natural and innate sense of justice. They will show us where to go with these conversations.


I don't think it gets "easier," but as I gain more skills and grow more with my students, I think the capacity for joy grows exponentially the longer I am around my kids.


It's easy to look at "difficult" populations as "those kids"-- but, more importantly, "those kids" are OUR kids, and they are KIDS. They deserve an amazing education designed with understanding who they are.


'Nanette' powerfully weaves humor, art history (!), comedy theory, gender, sexuality, and the power of storytelling together. How do we use it in the classroom?


As infuriating as the current U.S. news is, there's not much I can do as a teacher right now. The one thing I can do is prepare to hit the ground running next year.


The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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