This work must be led by those who have been historically oppressed, and if I want to support them, that means I must work to explore their writing and show my students just how powerful those voices are.


The field of education is missing a critical voice in how we can go about creating substantial and lasting change within public education and beyond.


Teaching with a socially conscious lens is not easy, nor does it happen overnight. There are some small steps you can take, though, to move you in the right direction.


"Aloha" isn't just a greeting; in a way it is their way of life, and when you distort that sacred word, you distort their way of life.


Educators engaging in emotion-talk with students can encounter obvious barriers when not taking the individual's cultural background into account.


There are some meaningful and important ways we can recenter power in our students' critical thinking.


The Covington Catholic High School students should reflect on what they did, but who were the adults there who failed them?


Seemingly little actions add up to the daily sparks that can begin igniting our students to take action and make change.


The intersectionality of students can eventually become a force for change for the individuals and the collective, once it is recognized and once actions to counterbalance injustice are created.


Will we duck away from the changes coming, or move forward, powered by those changes, toward something greater than ourselves?


The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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