Because we were all born into this unjust system, we cannot escape it's oppressive ways unless we actively and collectively work to disrupt it.... As a Black woman in this system, I need to go into work fully armored.


If we accept that educators become leaders because their voices get heard and their names become known, we must work on who gets heard and known.


We come to math with rich, diverse experiences from the real world, and mathematics is the thread of all those experiences. We can use our everyday language to describe mathematics, and to construct and make sense of mathematical ideas.


My mother has accepted that the pearls on the gates to my dream school only bedazzle an iron frame that locks me into a one-in-four statistic.


I think women before me sacrificed so much and did not receive recognition, but created or planted seeds to make the future brighter for females.


Considering what it means for me to be a woman in education means that I have to consider the multiple intersections of my own being, show my students the beauty in their own multiple-issue beings, and integrate all of those things to create an atmosphere of bidirectional learning.


I know that being a woman in education is important and affects the way I interact with my students and my work. I just have no. idea. how.


Each Friday this month, I'll post some ideas, folks to follow, and blog pieces about Black history, the work Black teachers are doing and how they are engaging in this month with their students.


As my students move through a media world that may try to tell them they don't exist, they don't matter, or their stories are only worth being the stereotypical B-plot of a sitcom, I want them to stare those assumptions in the face and say, "NO."


Each Friday this month, I'll post some ideas, folks to follow, and blog pieces about Black history, the work Black teachers are doing and how they are engaging in this month with their students.


The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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