Each Friday this month (or more), I'll post some ideas, folks to follow, and blog pieces about Black history, the work Black teachers are doing and how they are engaging in this month with their students.


Students of color aren't here to be props on your television shows, conveniently placed so that an episode looks like it's set in 2016 and not an era when these jokes weren't tired.


Focusing only on individual pieces of policy often leads to a myopic debate that relegates important, systemic issues of race and class to the peripheral (if mentioned at all).


Not all students think that way. There are so many different people who go to school, and so many factors that could affect a student's thought process and reasoning. This prevents every person being able to fit into the same mold.


If we want to combat the issues faced by students in oppressive environments, we need to do something radical and undo the damage from a system that failed them. We need to honor and cultivate their humanity.


If "teacher leadership" means seeking "innovative" ways to deny students knowledge, information, or history that is relevant for them in service of "compliance," I'm not interested and I'm running in the opposite direction.


1. Create lessons devoted to social justice 2. Invite a community member 3. Talk Less, Smile More


Our job is not to feed content to students. Our job is to prepare young people to dismantle systems that are currently failing them, as well as uplift the voices and ideas that showcase the best of their generation.


"Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare." - Audre Lorde


When you internalize concepts of social justice and an understanding of cultural competence, your internal compass can begin to guide the work. This winter break, I'm committing solid time to recalibrate, retune, and refresh my practice.


The opinions expressed in The Intersection: Culture and Race in Schools are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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