August 2012 Archives

Follow me on Twitter at @AnthonyCody This week, our exchange is focused on these questions: What is the purpose of K-12 education? How do we think about college and career readiness? How do the Common Core Standards fit in? This post is a response to one posted yesterday, authored by Irvin Scott of the Gates Foundation. This post can also be viewed and commented upon at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimists blog. Irvin Scott of the Gates Foundation has given us some vivid images of the students he taught, and sincerely described the fervent desire that motivates every teacher - ...


Guest post by Irvin Scott. In this fourth of five exchanges with the Gates Foundation, we take on some of the biggest questions of all: What is the purpose of a K-12 education? How do we think about college and career readiness? How do the Common Core Standards fit in? This post can also be viewed and commented on at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimist blog. My response will be posted tomorrow. I can still see Tyrese* in my classroom, Room 202. I can see where he sat during my Composition class. He did not come every day, but when ...


Guest post by Chris Williams of the Gates Foundation. This guest post is a response to Anthony Cody's post of a week ago, Can Schools Defeat Poverty by Ignoring It? This is the third topic in a series of five exchanges exploring critical issues in education reform. This post can also be viewed and commented upon at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimists blog. In his latest post in the "Dialogue with the Gates Foundation" series, Anthony Cody addresses the question, "What is the role of education reform in relation to the problem of family poverty? What is the best way ...


Guest post by Gerald Coles. In the debate over charter schools, KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program) schools are hailed by charter advocates as illustrative of what these alternatives to public schools can produce. With KIPP, poverty need not impede academic success. Enroll students from economically impoverished backgrounds in a "no excuses" school like KIPP and their chances of attaining academic success would soar markedly. There, neither hunger, poor health, relentless stress, lack of access to the material sustenance and cultural experiences available to students from more affluent homes, nor other adverse effects of poverty are impediments to learning and the ...


Follow me on Twitter at @AnthonyCody This post is the third round of a five-part exchange with the Gates Foundation. This post can also be viewed and commented on over at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimist blog. This time I get to go first, and our topic is this: What is the role of education reform in relation to the problem of family poverty? What is the best way to achieve greater equity in educational and life prospects for children of poverty? The Gates Foundation's central slogan is "All lives have equal value," and the thrust of their work around ...


Follow me on Twitter at @AnthonyCody This post is the second round in a five-part exchange with the Gates Foundation. This is a response to yesterday's post from Vicki Phillips, How do we Consider Evidence of Student Learning in Teacher Evaluations? This post can also be viewed and commented on over at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimists blog. Vicki Phillips opens her post with a complaint: Education debates are often characterized wrongly as two warring camps: blame teachers for everything that's not working in our schools or defend all teachers at all costs. This handwringing is hard to take seriously, ...


Guest post by Vicki Phillips. This post tackles the second topic in a five part dialogue with representatives of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It is also posted over at the Gates Foundation's Impatient Optimist blog. A response from Anthony Cody has now been posted here. Education debates are often characterized wrongly as two warring camps: blame teachers for everything that's not working in our schools or defend all teachers at all costs. But there's actually serious work going on in the middle, where there's a lot of common purpose around helping teachers improve their practice and students improve ...


Guest post by Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor School reform over the past decade has focused on two arenas: improving curriculum and instruction, and the way our schools are governed and managed. We have new curriculum, new tests, new evaluation schemes, new schools, new technology, and new teachers. But schools still are not doing anything significant to address factors interfering with youngsters benefiting from all these changes. As those who have followed our work know, we are determined to change this short-sighted state of affairs by ensuring there is a third primary and essential arena that directly focuses on addressing ...


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