July 2013 Archives

The panelists in the Fordham Institute's "Opt Out or Cop Out" discussion clearly enjoyed their surrealistic discussion of "accountability." They speculated on fanciful scenarios for micromanaging educators that were so disconnected from reality as to recall panelist Charlie Barone's tweet about "Dadaists Man Ray & Marcel DuChamp (who) used to play tennis w/o a net." Barone, a policy wonk for the Democrats for Education Reform (DFER), directed that charge against me. But, I'll leave it to readers to determine whether he or educators have a better understanding of high-poverty schools, and the effects of NCLB (which Barone helped draft) on ...


there is a new domestic cold war that pits public and private education against each other and seeks to turn human beings into computers


Teachers themselves are not, unfortunately, going to eliminate poverty, even if we get rid of the "bad" ones supposedly responsible for poor test scores.


The Gates Foundation has become influential in part due to its willingness to underwrite those who will speak in favor of its agenda.


what if TFA distanced itself from those who are destroying teacher unions, undermining due process, and redefining teacher quality as the ability to raise test scores?


whether at the K12 level or higher education, schools are facing the same push from Mr. Gates and his allies in business. Schools must serve employers, and must do it more cheaply than ever.


The verdict in the Trayvon Martin case will unfortunately reinforce the trauma that his death caused for people around the country


Many thousands of us have been fighting this battle for thirty and forty years and we remain relatively poor, isolated from the centers of power where big bucks are easy to acquire.


The Allure of Order describes the latest technocratic reform as another effort to turn the clock back to the mentality of the Model T assembly line.


A new study sheds startling light on a strong connection between high school exit exams and rates of incarceration.


If we embrace the Common Core, and position ourselves as expert implementers, we cannot help but legitimize these standards as a solid set of benchmarks for student performance.


In the real world, there is no way that Common Core standards and assessments will be "fair to students" when they are used to evaluate teachers and close schools.


Teachers hold ourselves and our colleagues accountable for making learning happen in our schools. And now it is time to start holding those in power accountable as well.


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