The year 2013 was one of gaining clarity about the strategies and objectives of Gatesian education reform. This clarity allows us to begin 2014 determined to move in a different direction.


It was supposed to be easy. The campaign was one of shock and awe, intended to overpower and silence anyone with the nerve to criticize.


As our schools take another step to becoming the next big bureaucracy in America, I would like to call for a conference of concern. With the new Common Core system, I see us shifting even further into a "one size fits all" factory of education,


A collective voice is rising that demands a more comprehensive route to school quality than the current test-and-punish system. And as we move closer to that path, we need to take a good, close look at how the actions of our principals impact the work of our teachers.


While I recognize that good-hearted people have been attempting to use charter schools as an avenue to help students not served well by traditional schools, the situation faced by public schools has become dire.


I am stunned by the situational ethics of reformers who employ the worst of the right wing's tactics to promote political policies that they claim to be progressive. I hope the Obama administration is even-handed


I wish there was another, less drastic measure than a hunger strike to realize my goals. But unfortunately, the system is so entrenched and resistant to change that there is no other way.


The fundamental question that has been presented to all of us through the Common Core process is this one: Who decides what is taught in our schools?


Origins are of great importance because they tell us so much about the soul, the essence of a project. The essence of the Common Core was developed by a handful of corporations and corporate-funded think tanks who wanted schools to meet certain benchmarks to better prepare the employees of the future.


Teachers, unions, students, and families are finding a common voice. It is the perfect time for the American Federation of Teachers to issue "The Principles that Unite Us," a call for labor and communities to unite in a new era of school reform.


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