Guest post by Gerald Coles Last week the New York Times provided valuable, disturbing information by reporting recent research on the growing educational achievement gap between rich and poor students, which has grown substantially over the past few decades, even while the achievement gap between black and white students has narrowed. As the author of one study put it, "family income appears more determinative of educational success than race." Yet, as is often true of the Times, what it gives with one hand, it takes with the other. For example, as the media watchdog group, Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting ...


Guest post by Sarah Puglisi. Often I ask people what they think or remember of school. After 30+ years teaching public school in areas of poverty--some of the "worst," apparently, in the nation--it interests me what the answer will be. Most often it has to do with a relationship between a student, a teacher, and the student's feelings of recognition of a gift, talent, ability, possibility. This is how hope operates in a real-world context. The stories usually celebrate what assisted that person to try to "make it in a tough world." I call these the echoes of my work. ...


Guest post by Jack Hassard. Cobb County, Georgia's second largest school district, decided not to consider the superintendent's request to hire 50 Teach for America (TFA) uncertified college graduates to work in under-performing schools in South Cobb. According to an editorial in the Marietta Daily Journal, Dr. Michael Hinojosa, the county's new superintendent (formerly superintendent of the Dallas ISD) had worked with the Atlanta office of the Teach for America program behind the scenes to bring the new teachers to the school district. Teach for America recruits and then trains the teachers in 5 week summer sessions before they assume ...


Guest post by Kelly Flynn. It's an unspoken pact: teachers will not talk about the biggest roadblock to teaching and learning. They'll talk about all sorts of other things, things you've heard a million times before: that it's hard to teach a hungry child, a frightened child, or a sick child. They'll also talk about the students they love, kids who have succeeded in spite of deplorable home lives and serious learning disabilities, kids who are kind, empathetic, funny, and wise. But they refuse to talk about the elephant in the room because it has become politically incorrect to do ...


Follow me on Twitter at @AnthonyCody In 1961, a Republican president, Dwight Eisenhower, closed his term with a speech that carried a prophetic warning. He said: Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend ...


Guest post by Jack Hassard Who the #@!% would make such a statement? Why would such a statement be made about America's youth? If you go the Broad Foundation Education page you will find the answer to the first question. This is the first of four statements about American youth, followed by "stark" statistics. The Broad Foundation says: "We have low expectations for American students." Shame on them! This is the foundation that has channeled over $400 million into education, primarily in charter schools, training of administrators, and online education. It's a very good time to be in the business of ...


Guest post by Katie Osgood. I have a pretty unique job. I work as a teacher on a child/adolescent inpatient unit at a psychiatric hospital in Chicago. My students come from all over Chicagoland and attend all types of schools: neighborhood, charter, turnaround, private, suburban, alternative, and sometimes no school at all. The vast majority of my students, however, come from low-income minority neighborhoods. My job allows me a rare birds-eye view of the educational landscape here in Chicago. And I do not like what I see. My students are often very sick. The reasons they find themselves hospitalized ...


Guest post by John Kuhn. Part Two of two. I ended the last posting with a list of possible causes of the superior academic results seen in Highland Park ISD as compared to Everman ISD. In this posting, I want to talk at length about causality, because it is at the core. The battle line over causality, like all battle lines, is defined by two sides. One side shouts, "It's poverty, stupid," and the other shouts, "Quit making excuses and get results." Who to side with? There are two main reasons I side with the poverty faction (not including the ...


Part 1 of 2 Guest post by John Kuhn. "There's a hole in the bucket, Dear Liza, Dear Liza." At the root of the school reform debate as I see it is a fundamental disagreement about causality. No one disagrees that by any number of measures (PISA scores, graduation rates, etc.) the academic outcomes of some American students are horrendously unacceptable. On this point, even Michelle Rhee and Diane Ravitch are in perfect agreement, along with everyone else who thinks even a little bit about education. But then the wheels come off. When you ask the question, "What caused this?" ...


Follow me on Twitter at @AnthonyCody As state after state rewrites their education laws in line with the mandates from Race to the Top and the NCLB waiver process, the teaching profession is being redefined. Teachers will now pay the price - be declared successes or failures, depending on the rise or fall of their students' test scores. Under NCLB it was schools that were declared failures. In states being granted waivers to NCLB, it is teachers who will be subjected to this ignominy. Of course we will still be required to label the bottom 5% of our schools as ...


Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • Jackie Conrad: National standards will result in making teachers as dishonest as read more
  • Marsha Ratzel: I couldn't agree with Anthony any more about that national read more
  • Anthony Cody: Leslie, Thank you for stating so eloquently the reason so read more
  • Leslie S. Leff: Dear President Obama, I became an elementary teacher over 20 read more
  • marc: Well, since you're asking for my professional opinion, first I read more