When was the last time you heard a teacher exclaim "You don't know how much I needed this?"


In which direction should the dialogue about school reform run? What would happen if we turned the pyramid on its side, rendering all parties equal and the conversations horizontal and bi-directional?


Is newer always better, when it comes to education? Might some values and practices be timeless?


High school sports get more space than national news, most days. And high school athletes get more mentions in the local press than National Merit Scholars.


What happens when you confuse "quality teacher" with actual teaching quality?


Are teachers overpaid? How much does compensation matter in building a high-quality teaching force?


Teachers usually approach Halloween with a mix of stoic resignation and determined tolerance for excess. As in: I got through this before, and I can do it again. Pass the Kit Kat bars.


The huge increase in testing hasn't told us a single thing we didn't already know about who holds the cards in the education game, who will take home the biggest piece of the pie. We don't need more data.


The Teach for America alumni assumed they already had a seat at the table, and a genuine voice in policy creation. The student teachers in Michigan were just trying to get hired.


The best classrooms are full of sticky items, places where kids cluster and are encouraged to interpret and apply things they've learned.


The opinions expressed in Teacher in a Strange Land are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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