I would describe our system as a spider web of interdependency, and I believe it will take transformation of almost every thread to rebuild it into a system that our kids not only deserve, but that our economy will need to continue to grow. There is no simple, cheap miracle fix that will bring about transformative change for the education profession and the American education system; the entire web needs to be re-woven.


When it comes to the success of an individual classroom, nothing is more important than the relationship between the teacher and the students. When it comes to the success of an entire school, nothing is more important than the relationship of the adults in the building.


America has always had a complicated relationship with its public schools. Stop 100 people at the mall and ask them about their child's teacher, and you will hear affection in the vast majority of responses. Dare to suggest that a small school close and merge with another school 10 miles away, and you will hear passionate loyalty. Yet we still perceive our national system to be inferior


A few weeks ago I had an opportunity to come to Washington DC and talk about innovative models for professional development that are cropping up around the country. I sat on a panel with a very distinguished education scholar from Harvard, two practicing teachers, and two principals; all of us engaged in re-imagining how professional development can and should be delivered to teachers. I shared the work I'm helping lead in Burbank to an audience of advocates, policy-builders, union leaders, educators, and non-profit organizers.


Before making any sweeping changes to education policy, I would want to know this: What do teachers think? Even better: What do our best teachers think?


If you are a teacher leader who finds yourself working furiously, but still waiting for that first follower to make you feel not so alone, here are some dollops of wisdom collected from others like you.


By: Joseph Fatheree It was around this time a year ago that I found myself sitting in attendance at the International Summit on the Teaching Profession listening to the world's education leaders discussing the pressing issues of the day. I was one of six teachers that had been invited by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to attend the meeting as an official delegate. One of the main themes of the event was teacher efficacy. During one of the sessions, Andreas Schleicher, OECD's Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills, shared the results of the TALIS Report. The ...


In schools across the country, the décor of hearts and snowman is being replaced by shamrocks and rainbows as the winter blahs begin to melt with the rising temperatures. I often read leprechaun tales to my students in March, encouraging them to write what they would spend the pot of gold on or what they would ask the leprechaun for if granted three wishes. This time, I'm giving my 3 teacher wishes but I'm going to add some actions that can make those wishes come true. My first wish is that ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) does not become a "four...


"You do have an ability to get students to do things, now it is about changing what you ask students to do."


Put your eye on some kind of change you would like to make--in your classroom, within your department or grade level, or within your entire school, and create your own leadership role by reaching out to another educator, Angie Miller writes.


The opinions expressed in Teacher-Leader Voices are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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