By: Joseph Fatheree It was around this time a year ago that I found myself sitting in attendance at the International Summit on the Teaching Profession listening to the world's education leaders discussing the pressing issues of the day. I was one of six teachers that had been invited by U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to attend the meeting as an official delegate. One of the main themes of the event was teacher efficacy. During one of the sessions, Andreas Schleicher, OECD's Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills, shared the results of the TALIS Report. The ...


In schools across the country, the décor of hearts and snowman is being replaced by shamrocks and rainbows as the winter blahs begin to melt with the rising temperatures. I often read leprechaun tales to my students in March, encouraging them to write what they would spend the pot of gold on or what they would ask the leprechaun for if granted three wishes. This time, I'm giving my 3 teacher wishes but I'm going to add some actions that can make those wishes come true. My first wish is that ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) does not become a "four...


"You do have an ability to get students to do things, now it is about changing what you ask students to do."


Put your eye on some kind of change you would like to make--in your classroom, within your department or grade level, or within your entire school, and create your own leadership role by reaching out to another educator, Angie Miller writes.


Teachers who become Teacher-Leaders naturally strive toward creating broad, positive changes that have a big impact. As we strive toward these goals, we are also prone to making three key mistakes that can undermine the work we're doing to strengthen our schools, communities and the world of education.


Maddie Fennell explains the benefits and inclusiveness teachers will experience with the birth of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Rebecca Mieliwocki writes an energizing and motivating post about how teachers can manage the day-to-day responsibilities in the classroom and also become a leaders in their school and community.


I've heard it countless times. I've used it in moments of desperation or uncertainty or even passivity. No doubt, you've heard them too. But it's time to let go of this oft called upon phrase, this unlikely nemesis of teacher leadership: "Don't worry. You're already doing this."


As fingers point in all directions about the cause of the shortage, and districts scramble to find busloads of new recruits to fix it, we may be overlooking an incredibly valuable resource just under our noses: the new teachers already in our classrooms.


The opinions expressed in Teacher-Leader Voices are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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