How do you capture the life of a liberation leader, political prisoner, and president who helped end a nation's system of racial oppression? How do you convey his place in history for students?


A new survey out of the United Kingdom finds that, despite their apparent absorbtion in digital devices, young people still seem to like their books in printed form. Meanwhile, The New York Times examines the curious "staying power" of the book.


Surveys by the Associated Administrators of Los Angeles and the United Teachers of Los Angeles reveal discrepancies in teacher and administrator reactions to the Los Angeles Unified School District's $1-billion iPad program, The L.A. Times reports.


Austin, Texas, elementary school teacher Emily E. Smith argues that classroom-design conventions are in need of a serious upgrade. She explains how, to create a more creative space for learning, she reconfigured her own classroom based on photos of successful tech startup offices


In an Ill. elementary school, students switch classes so teachers can focus on particular subject areas as the school adapts to the Common Core State Standards.


T.H.E Journal compiles nine tips on for teachers interested in flipping their classrooms—defined as having students watch videos lessons on their own while reserving classtime for more one-on-one instruction and active learning.


Most of the K-12 education-policy world has spent the last several years obsessing over ways to improve teaching, but as The Chronicle of Higher Education noted recently there has been no parallel movement in higher education.


Five teachers from across the United States were awarded the Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence. The winners receive $10,000 each.


This Friday, Nov. 22, marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Because Kennedy's life and death remain such a deep source of public fascination—and because he was such a central figure in 20th-century political history—many educators are viewing this as a significant teaching moment.


In a captivating keynote last Sunday at the Learning & the Brain conference in Boston, G. Christian Jernstedt, a professor of psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College, discussed some broad brain-science principles regarding how people learn that may be helpful for classroom educators.


Several initiatives nationwide are encouraging students, public figures, and other individuals to recite the 16th president's iconic speech, including an effort spearheaded by award-winning documentarian Ken Burns.


In an address on deeper learning at the Learning and the Brain conference in Boston this weekend, Christine Massey, the director of research and education at the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania, offered a helpful definition: "We take deeper learning as the process of learning for transfer."


Author-educators Marc Prensky and Will Richardson opened up this weekend's conference with some big ideas on how technology is changing learning and the many ways schools need to adapt and catch up.


As part of a new plan to expand a number of its highs schools, the Portland, Ore., school district is reportedly looking into a design model that would be based on a "college-style" use of classrooms. What this means, essentially, is that teachers would share classrooms but would have offices where they could meet with students and each other.


In anticipation of the one-year anniversary of the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 students and six teachers were killed by an intruder last December, former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) has collaborated with a victim's mother and a teacher to write an anti-violence lesson plan for schools.


Reflecting on recent news about another teen software genius, a Catholic school educator wonders how schools can better support advanced students who have creative interests outside of conventional academic areas.


The Huffington Post recently published a list of 11 high-profile education leaders who've never been teachers.


The developers of a new performance-based teacher-licensing test have a clear message for states that want to use it: Set the passing bar high, but not too high.


Some have been quick to cite changes to teacher evaluation and tenure processes as explanation for the NAEP gains in Tennessee and D.C. But it's more complicated than that.


Ariel Sacks, an 8th grade language arts teacher in New York City, argues that the best way to help students who can decode text but struggle with comprehension is not to focus on particular tricks or strategies but to give them time with good stories.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments