Sarah Camiscoli, a literacy intervention teacher for English-language learners at a small public middle school in the South Bronx, moved away from disciplining to listening and gaining greater understanding of her students' needs.


In a national survey, educators report high levels of educator effectiveness, but say parents are not doing enough to ensure student success.


The president's speech started with praise for teachers, who had a lot to say about the address on Twitter.


A blogging educator says that keeping a blog can help teachers reflect, discuss methods that work best and ones that need improvement, and vent their stress and anxiety.


Kathy Hollowell-Makle, a former member of Teach For America, will be one of Michelle Obama's guests at the annual address.


Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World, pushes back on the theory that U.S. students' weak performance on international-comparison tests can be attributed largely to high poverty rates.


New telepresence robots will help facilitate instruction in a remote area of Alaska.


North Dakota may give its teachers more control over their classrooms than any other state, followed closely by South Dakota.


A credit union in Las Vegas now offers loans to K-12 teachers struggling to pay for classroom materials. This reflects a trend among teachers who pay more out of pocket to buy classroom supplies.


The state's department of education is creating a rule that will make teachers accountable for students who might be absent for the first several weeks of the school year.


In a scenario that is becoming increasingly familiar, a teacher in New Mexico is being praised this week for putting his life on the line to protect students from an armed assailant. The incident has prompted additional concern about whether teachers receive adequate training in handling crisis situations like school shootings.


Four educators, hailing from Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, have been announced by the Council of Chief State School Officers as the finalists for the 2014 National Teacher of the Year Award.


In another example of the heated controversies still swirling around the Common Core State Standards, a state senator in Mississippi charged last week that a local school district superintendent had threatened to fire teachers for expressing opposition to the Common Core State Standards.


A new study out of Emory University offers evidence that reading novels is more than just high-level entertainment. It also appears to be good for your brain.


The Hope Street Group, a nonprofit advocacy group focused on economic opportunity, announced 13 teachers and instructional coaches from across the country to participate in the group's National Teacher Fellowship.


An elementary school in Wichita, Kan., recently took a unique approach to sensitizing teachers to the needs of disadvantaged students, reports The Wichita Eagle. According to the January 5th article, teachers and staff members at Allen Elementary School participated in a role-playing simulation intended to elucidate the unseen challenges of poverty.


A recently-released study concludes that good looks tend to improve a student's chances of academic success, including better grades in high school, according to a CNN research column.


John Cisna, a high school science teacher in Iowa, reportedly lost nearly 40 pounds in part by partaking of an calorie-limited McDonalds-only diet that he used as a class project on nutrition. But did he cross a line by involving his students in his weight loss expedition?


The International Reading Association announced this week that is again teaming up with the American Basketball Association to encourage students to increase the time they spend reading. The program, called Fast Break for Reading, provides participating students a ticket to an ABA game of their choice, as well as a certificate and eligibility for a grand prize.


The number of subscribers to educational YouTube channels tripled in 2013, according to an end-of-year NPR story. And a major contributor to that growth has been increased interest in "pop science"—or what YouTube calls "explainer"—videos.


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