Most of the K-12 education-policy world has spent the last several years obsessing over ways to improve teaching, but as The Chronicle of Higher Education noted recently there has been no parallel movement in higher education.


Five teachers from across the United States were awarded the Horace Mann Awards for Teaching Excellence. The winners receive $10,000 each.


This Friday, Nov. 22, marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Because Kennedy's life and death remain such a deep source of public fascination—and because he was such a central figure in 20th-century political history—many educators are viewing this as a significant teaching moment.


In a captivating keynote last Sunday at the Learning & the Brain conference in Boston, G. Christian Jernstedt, a professor of psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth College, discussed some broad brain-science principles regarding how people learn that may be helpful for classroom educators.


Several initiatives nationwide are encouraging students, public figures, and other individuals to recite the 16th president's iconic speech, including an effort spearheaded by award-winning documentarian Ken Burns.


In an address on deeper learning at the Learning and the Brain conference in Boston this weekend, Christine Massey, the director of research and education at the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania, offered a helpful definition: "We take deeper learning as the process of learning for transfer."


Author-educators Marc Prensky and Will Richardson opened up this weekend's conference with some big ideas on how technology is changing learning and the many ways schools need to adapt and catch up.


As part of a new plan to expand a number of its highs schools, the Portland, Ore., school district is reportedly looking into a design model that would be based on a "college-style" use of classrooms. What this means, essentially, is that teachers would share classrooms but would have offices where they could meet with students and each other.


In anticipation of the one-year anniversary of the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 students and six teachers were killed by an intruder last December, former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) has collaborated with a victim's mother and a teacher to write an anti-violence lesson plan for schools.


Reflecting on recent news about another teen software genius, a Catholic school educator wonders how schools can better support advanced students who have creative interests outside of conventional academic areas.


The Huffington Post recently published a list of 11 high-profile education leaders who've never been teachers.


The developers of a new performance-based teacher-licensing test have a clear message for states that want to use it: Set the passing bar high, but not too high.


Some have been quick to cite changes to teacher evaluation and tenure processes as explanation for the NAEP gains in Tennessee and D.C. But it's more complicated than that.


Ariel Sacks, an 8th grade language arts teacher in New York City, argues that the best way to help students who can decode text but struggle with comprehension is not to focus on particular tricks or strategies but to give them time with good stories.


This is just plain fun. David Hovan, a sixth-year AP physics teacher at St. John's College High School in the District of Columbia, demonstrated a most impressive talent for his students—spinning a basketball on top of a pen while writing. A resourceful high schooler, of course, caught it on video: Hovan's feat, remarkable in and of itself, gets extra points for being academically relevant. Here's his explanation, via USA TODAY: "We had been talking about angular momentum and the formation of the solar system," said Hovan, who has earned a pair of graduate degrees in education after studying physics...


TNTP, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring that "all students get excellent teachers," is now accepting applications for the 3rd annual Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice. Teachers working with low-income students are eligible for the prize, which is awarded to four teachers annually. Winners receive $25,000 and participate in a six-week summer residency. TNTP also publishes papers by winners about their teaching experiences and offering advice to other teachers. At last year's residency program, winners discussed effective teaching practices, wrote about their own teaching, and met U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Senator Dick Durbin on ...


At a campaign event in Somers Point, N.J., teacher Melissa Tomlinson approached New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and asked why he'd called his state's schools "failure factories."


PBS Math Club's interactive video series seeks to relate math to students' interests to make it more interesting to a middle school demographic.


A new tech tool, backed by $3.5 million in financing, is designed to let teachers communicate efficiently with their students outside of class without having to resort to social-media or text-message appeals that might come off as "creepy."


The Washington-based National Council on Teacher Quality released its annual report rounding up states' teacher-evaluation policies, which have become increasingly stringent over the last few years.


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