As part of a new plan to expand a number of its highs schools, the Portland, Ore., school district is reportedly looking into a design model that would be based on a "college-style" use of classrooms. What this means, essentially, is that teachers would share classrooms but would have offices where they could meet with students and each other.

In anticipation of the one-year anniversary of the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 students and six teachers were killed by an intruder last December, former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) has collaborated with a victim's mother and a teacher to write an anti-violence lesson plan for schools.

Reflecting on recent news about another teen software genius, a Catholic school educator wonders how schools can better support advanced students who have creative interests outside of conventional academic areas.

The Huffington Post recently published a list of 11 high-profile education leaders who've never been teachers.

The developers of a new performance-based teacher-licensing test have a clear message for states that want to use it: Set the passing bar high, but not too high.

Some have been quick to cite changes to teacher evaluation and tenure processes as explanation for the NAEP gains in Tennessee and D.C. But it's more complicated than that.

Ariel Sacks, an 8th grade language arts teacher in New York City, argues that the best way to help students who can decode text but struggle with comprehension is not to focus on particular tricks or strategies but to give them time with good stories.

This is just plain fun. David Hovan, a sixth-year AP physics teacher at St. John's College High School in the District of Columbia, demonstrated a most impressive talent for his students—spinning a basketball on top of a pen while writing. A resourceful high schooler, of course, caught it on video: Hovan's feat, remarkable in and of itself, gets extra points for being academically relevant. Here's his explanation, via USA TODAY: "We had been talking about angular momentum and the formation of the solar system," said Hovan, who has earned a pair of graduate degrees in education after studying physics...

TNTP, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring that "all students get excellent teachers," is now accepting applications for the 3rd annual Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice. Teachers working with low-income students are eligible for the prize, which is awarded to four teachers annually. Winners receive $25,000 and participate in a six-week summer residency. TNTP also publishes papers by winners about their teaching experiences and offering advice to other teachers. At last year's residency program, winners discussed effective teaching practices, wrote about their own teaching, and met U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Senator Dick Durbin on ...

At a campaign event in Somers Point, N.J., teacher Melissa Tomlinson approached New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and asked why he'd called his state's schools "failure factories."

PBS Math Club's interactive video series seeks to relate math to students' interests to make it more interesting to a middle school demographic.

A new tech tool, backed by $3.5 million in financing, is designed to let teachers communicate efficiently with their students outside of class without having to resort to social-media or text-message appeals that might come off as "creepy."

The Washington-based National Council on Teacher Quality released its annual report rounding up states' teacher-evaluation policies, which have become increasingly stringent over the last few years.

The ever-enticing Buzzfeed published a list of "24 Thoughtful Gifts for Teachers." And commenters weren't too happy about the selections.

An initial study of CARE For Teachers finds that the program increases well-being, efficacy, and mindfulness for teachers, while helping them cope with burnout.

A Wired magazine story looks at the effects of a "radical new teaching method" in which teachers stop direct instructing and start posing problems for students to solve. Could the approach lead, as one educational researcher posits, to teacherless schools?

On Oct. 29, some 6,000 schools will reportedly be participating in the 12th annual Mix It Up at Lunch Day, an initiative that encourages students to break out of their habitual social patterns and sit with someone new at lunch time. This year, the group behind the idea is asking Congress to participate as well.

At Lincoln-Erdman Elementary School in Sheboygan, Wis., a new program puts 4th and 5th grade students together in classes according to their skill levels, reports the Sheboygan Press. The program aims to allow teachers to tailor class time to students' needs and to prepare students for middle school, where they will switch classrooms every period.

While teacher-evaluation results were high for most of New York state, they were low in urban pockets, including Syracuse.

Here's an interesting urban renewal story that has a very distinct connection to teaching: In an effort to revive its blighted downtown area, the city of Newark, N.J., last month officially launched a new development known as Teachers Village.

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