The growing numbers of second-generation Latino students attending U.S. schools pose new challenges for teachers, according to a Fox News Latino report. These students are often fluent in English but use speech infused with Spanish accents, rhythm, and usage that they pick up in their Latino communities. By the same token, they struggle with the standard English that is generally needed to perform well on standardized tests and other school assignments. Fox News Latino cites a study conducted in Texas that looked at ways to raise these students' competency in standard English. Linguists who worked on the study argue ...


Worried that her students aren't ready for upcoming English Regents exam, the normally droll NYC teacher Miss Eyre finds herself coming a bit unglued: I freely admit that I'm not handling this well. I'm taking it personally, practically as an affront to me, that my kids don't seem 100% ready this close to the test. I'm comparing my students to the other teachers' student and blaming myself for them not measuring up. I'm making myself sick over it, wondering what I've been doing wrong all year, talking myself down from freaking out on whatever child or colleague happens to be ...


A news outlet in Ann Arbor, Mich., reports on a local educator—a former nonprofit professional in her 40s with an MA in education and an endorsement in learning disabilities—who has been looking for a full-time teaching position for seven years now.


Greg Limperis, supervisor of instructional technology in Lawrence, Mass., says current school data-system dashboards are too voluminous and static to meet the instructional needs of today's teachers. So he envisions an alternative that is more timely, interactive, and mobile: Imagine with me a day when a teacher can walk around the classroom connected to the intranet or Internet and speak a question that's automatically transcribed, assigned to a student, responded to, and relayed back to the teacher to help a student. With instant data collection, a teacher can pinpoint and diagnose student trouble points, know who lacks understanding in precisely ...


Are you heading toward teacher burnout? Over on Edutopia, Rutgers University professor Maurice Elias highlights recent research on contributing factors and warning signs. He also suggests that resolving burnout generally isn't just a matter of taking a couple of days off to refresh or somehow bucking up and putting a smile on your face. You may need to confront deeper issues related to school culture: Teacher burnout is most often an organizational problem and it is insidious because it can remove dedicated teachers from the field of education, sometimes even before they physically leave their jobs. Its solution is found ...


Our Classroom Q&A blogger Larry Ferlazzo's school, Luther Burbank High in Sacramento, Calif., has been named on Washington Post columnist Jay Mathew's list of America's Most Challenging High Schools, which ranks schools based on the number of students included in advanced or college-level courses. We'd say congratulations, but Larry seems to have mixed feelings about the honor—while his principal apparently reacted to the news by calling such school rankings "meaningless" and "quite possible destructive. ..." For Larry, the recognition is particularly bittersweet—and ironic—since, he says, the school is slated to lose 21 teachers to layoffs this...


Carolyn Abbott, a 7th and 8th grade math teacher in New York City, is one unhappy educator. According to a post by sociologist Aaron M. Pallas on The Hechinger Report, Abbott's score on the New York City Department of Education's Teacher Data report has ranked her the worst 8th grade math teacher in the city.


As has been widely reported, the College Board named David Coleman, the architect of the Common Core standards, as its in-coming president this week. The news has brought renewed attention to a statement Coleman made during a 2011 speech to the effect that, out in the working world, you will rarely hear a request like "Johnson, I need a market analysis by Friday, but before that I need a compelling account of your childhood." (You probably won't hear people being called by their last names at work nowadays, either, but that's a different story.) Since the common standards place increased ...


Gary Rubinstein, author of the blog post "Why I Did TFA, and Why You Shouldn't," which went viral after it was posted in October, buries an enticing tidbit in his recent blog post: Depending on how much free time I'll have this summer, I might be helping organize new TFA corps members to be 'disrupting' the institute if they are not getting properly trained or are feeling like they are being lied to in various ways—more to come on that in June. 'Institute,' to a TFAer, is the boot-camp-style training that incoming corps members attend for five weeks...


In his blog The White Rhino: A Chicago Latino English Teacher, Ray Salazar argues that the five-paragraph essay should be tossed out the window.


Writing in The Hechinger Report, California math teacher Kyle Hunsberger reminds school leaders and policymakers that revamped teacher-evaluation systems—especially those relying heavily on student test scores—will only be as effective as the infrastructural supports that gird them: As a teacher, I need to know that my potential "value-added" metric is reliable, but I also need to know that my administrator will sit down and go over my scores with me, offering concrete suggestions on how I can improve. He might identify colleagues I could observe and from whom I could learn successful practices. He might even notice patterns...


Tennessee has created a new measure proposing that parents of students evaluate themselves on report cards.


Teachers in New York State received a special Teacher Appreciation Week email message from the state education commissioner this week that, in addition to expressing thanks "for all the work you do every day" etc., spent a few paragraphs fleshing out the details of the state's new evaluation system. N.Y.C. teacher Ms. Eyre scratches her head: Usually when I tell someone that I appreciate them, I don't tell them that I'm going to be figuring out a new way to evaluate their performance (and presumably re-evaluate exactly how much I appreciate them) in the next breath. But maybe ...


A new study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology finds that teachers may be less inclined to respond critically to work by minority students, thus creating a "positive feedback bias" that may contribute to racial achievement gaps. The study, covered in The Atlantic and The Huffington Post, asked more than 100 teachers in the New York City area to grade a poorly written (but fake) student essay. The researchers found that teachers who thought the essay was written by a black or Latino student (by virtue of the student name provided) tended to offer more praise and less criticism ...


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan made a surprise visit to Luke C. Moore High School in Washington on Wednesday morning to join teachers and school support staff for a Teacher Appreciation Week breakfast.


English teacher Renee Moore follows up on that study finding that automated grading programs can assess student essays as effectively as human readers can. Moore says that her experience, it just so happens, has been exactly the opposite. Besides, she adds, responding to student writing is about more than just providing a grade: Our students are sharing their thoughts with us, and before anything else, teachers should be respectful, thoughtful readers of those ideas. Like many of my colleagues, I respond to my students' writing with questions and comments--on what they are saying. ... When I sit down next to each ...


Maybe this guy just holds a special place in my heart because I once ran into him in a Sally's Beauty Supply store in Phoenix (no, I have no further explanation for why he was there, and yes, he is massive!), but ... ... over the weekend, NBA legend Shaquille O'Neal earned his doctoral degree in education from Barry University in Florida. According to The Miami Herald, the now-retired basketball star has been "quietly working toward his doctoral degree in organizational learning and leadership with a specialization in human resource development. He studied before and after games, and between his work on ...


Anthony Salcito, vice president of education for Microsoft Corp.'s Worldwide Public Sector, has selected our very own blogger David Ginsburg (A.K.A. Coach G.) as one of his 365 global heroes in education. Salcito's blog project is intended to highlight individuals who are "making meaningful changes in their communities to ensure a bright future for young people." Below David—who, as his readers know by now, believes that real education reform starts with effective classroom practice—explains his theory of "cause-effect coaching":...


As a colleague pointed out to me today, 'Pineapplegate'—the uproar about a question on the New York state reading test—isn't going away. So it's high time we blogged about it. The controversy started when the New York Daily News ran a piece summarizing an "absurd test question about a talking pineapple," which the paper said has confused students, parents, and educators. The Daily News learned about the question—a silly rewrite of the Aesop's fable "The Tortoise and the Hare" in which a pineapple challenges a hare to a foot race—after a parent posted it on her...


Public school teachers in New York City may not contact students through personal pages on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, according to the Education Department's first set of social media policy guidelines released on Tuesday.


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