In an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, author and educator Mike Rose encourages new teachers to stand fast against the "push to define teaching in technical and managerial terms." He writes: You hear little from the federal Department of Education or the local school board about engaging young people's minds or about teaching as an intellectual journey. You don't often hear about the values that brought you into teaching. They are the mind and heart of the work you will be doing....


Thirty-three states across the nation have proposed cutting K-12 spending in the 2011 fiscal year.


After a three year wait, District of Columbia teachers approved their new contract today. The new five-year agreement grants 21.6% raises to teachers, raising the average salary from $67,000 to $81,000. The contract, which is said to be the first of its kind in the country, is being supported by $60 million in foundation money. It will give Chancellor Michelle A. Rhee the ability to award performance pay and fire underperforming teachers, reports Education Week staff writer Dakarai Aarons. At the same time, the New York Times is reporting that New York City's Mayor Bloomberg is freezing ...


Ever wonder why exactly African-American students who do well in school are seen by some of their peers as "acting white" (as Michelle Obama among others has testified to)? According to Stuart Buck, an author and University of Arkansas doctoral candidate, the disparagement actually derives from the school-desegregation movement in the 1960s: Although desegregation arose from noble and necessary impulses, and although desegregation was to the overall benefit of the nation, it was often implemented in a way that was devastating to black communities. It destroyed black schools, reduced the numbers of black principals and teachers who could serve as ...


On Wednesday, Harlem's Apollo Theater—where the Jackson 5, Stevie Wonder, and Billie Holiday once performed—will host New York City's first Teachers' Night! as part of its Amateur Night series, reports the New York Times. Seventeen teacher acts are expected to perform in an event where, according to Apollo tradition, the audience will determine who lives and who dies on the stage. Among the acts will be a self-described "explosive" hula hooper who has performed in Las Vegas and Off Broadway, a band called the Suspensions (rejected names included the Hall Passes and Detention), as well as comedians,...


An education professor argues that efforts to tie teachers' professional status to student test scores could stifle good instruction. Is he right?


Oklahoma teachers got some tough news this week that could hit them in their wallets.


In a Washington Post op-ed, the chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers makes the economic case for the education jobs bill: Because unemployed teachers have to cut back on spending, local businesses and overall economic activity suffer. And the costs of decreased learning time and support for students will be felt not just in the next year or two but will reduce our productivity for decades to come. Meanwhile, North Carolina teacher Cindi Rigsbee is furious after reading that her state is cutting teaching jobs even while maintaining its budget (to the tune of $14 million) for ...


A new English curriculum in Nevada could eliminate the standard high school literature canon, and a number of teachers are not happy about that.


What makes some teachers better than others? A new study from the Rand Corp. concludes that, well, it's tough to know. The study, which examined data from the Los Angeles Unified School District over a five year period, found that there was little correlation between teacher effectiveness (as measured by student test-score progress) and any particular qualifications or credentials. That includes years of experience, education level attained, or licensure test scores. Even initially failing a licensure exam showed no "statistically significant link" to a teacher's future effectiveness. So what now? The study suggests that "education experts" may need to "develop ...


Miss Eyre, in a post on NYC Educator, explains her ambigious stance on her school's student dress code policy. As well, if a child is dressed improperly, I am supposed to send that child directly to the office to either change clothes or wait for a parent or guardian to bring a change of clothes. Now, again, I am theoretically in favor of a policy like this. However, in the recent past at my school, a child has told a teacher to go f--- herself only to be promptly returned to the classroom, and another child called a classmate a ...


With so-many school layoffs and hiring freezes being reported, you'd think it wouldn't be hard for a school to find good teachers right now. But Epiphany in Baltimore has found that, for a variety of reasons—most notably district recruitment and preference policies—that's not the case....


A college teacher, citing some pretty ugly statistics, wonders why so many students come to college not knowing the fundamentals of decent writing, and suggests we need to rethink "the way writing is taught in high school -- and, perhaps, the way teachers are compensated." A respondent—also a college teacher—argues that part of the problem stems from English teachers' schoolmarmish inclination to mark up and fix everything that's wrong in a student's paper: Effective teachers of writing identify a small number of patterns of error -- perhaps three per writing project -- and then teach students how to correct...


After allowing four students to dress in Klan hoods in school for a film project, an Atlanta teacher is now facing suspension or termination.


A group of accomplished teachers representing Anthony Cody's Teachers' Letters to Obama campaign got a chance to express their concerns and ideas about federal education policy in a conference call with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and colleagues yesterday. Unfortunately, from the teachers point of view, it turned out to be a frustrating experience. Both Cody and Nancy Flanagan have posted accounts of the call. Definitely worth a read. UPDATE 5/26: Interesting: Cody gets a callback....


Valerie Strauss of the Washington Post's Answer Sheet blog tries to find "the most egregious twist of history" in Texas' new social studies curriculum standards (including some proposals that didn't make the final cut).


The education-policy community is abuzz over an article by journalist Steven Brill that appeared in the New York Times Magazine yesterday (though it's been online for a few days). Titled "The Teachers' Unions' Last Stand," the piece looks at the powerful reform forces that have coalesced around the Obama administration's Race to the Top competition (with particular emphasis on its teacher-accountabilty provisions) and at the seemingly out-of-touch—not to say doomed—efforts of teachers' unions and their supportors to resist wholesale changes to teachers' protections. One flashpoint of the article is a devastating comparison (on first blush, anyway) of a regular...


A group of 1st graders in Kansas had a hands-on lesson about cleaning up oil spills this week, with the Gulf of Mexico disaster in mind.


Diane Ravitch, explaining her recent change of heart on accountability-based reform, goes Jungian: I sometimes wonder whether you might be attracted to the things that you say are wrong--if you're kind of guarding yourself against something that secretly appeals to you. It's like people who are vehement, militant atheists; I think they could easily become religious crusaders, because they're almost religious in their atheism. You have to be careful what you choose to engage yourself with, because the thing you're fighting could be the very thing you want....


A new social network called "Togetherville" aims to be the web-safe version of Facebook for students ages 10 and under.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments