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November 17, 2011

Tearing Down Writing Instruction

Washington Post education writer Jay Mathews argues that writing instruction in most schools today is "academic and lifeless." Nor does he think the new common core writing standards—redolent, in his view, of "clerical work"—will help matters much. So what's a language arts teacher to do...

November 04, 2011

Could Teachers Be Displaced by Technology?

Will Richardson says that teachers urgently need to redefine their professional role in light of advancements in technology and prevailing expectations for schools. If teachers' main purpose is seen as improving student achievement as reflected in test scores, he argues, they will soon be displaced,...

October 21, 2011

Poll: Public Skeptical of Digital Texts in Schools

Here's a surprising, somewhat out-of-the-way finding: A national poll conducted last month found that most Americans (68 percent) are opposed to the idea of schools using iPads or e-readers in place print books. Interestingly, women and young people (ages 18-29) were the most strongly opposed. Only ...

September 23, 2011

Teacher Makes $230,000 on Lesson Plans

Two years ago, Deanna Jump, a Georgia kindergarten teacher with two kids in college, was struggling to make it from paycheck to paycheck. More recently, though, she has found herself rocketing up the tax brackets. Jump is still teaching kindergarten—but she is now also the top seller on Teach...

September 19, 2011

Has Reading Instruction Lost the 'Gist'?

In the New York Times, literary critic and Core Knowledge Foundation founder E.D. Hirsch reasserts his case that the recent drop in SAT reading scores derives not from student demographic changes but from a long-term de-intellectualization of elementary school curricula: The most credible analyses...

September 08, 2011

Should Teachers Be Free to Critique 9/11 Issues?

In an op-ed piece in the Philadelphia Inquirer, New York University History Professor Jonathan Zimmerman writes that historically U.S. teachers have often been restricted from honestly critiquing the country's military conflicts—and may have even less leeway now than at any time since the 1960s...

September 02, 2011

Teaching 9/11

By Education Week Assistant Editor Erik Robelen. This post originally appeared in Education Week's Curriculum Matters blog. The U.S. Department of Education has announced a new Web page with resources to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. (Just yesterday, we posted an EdWeek st...

August 26, 2011

Re-inventing the Math Curriculum

In an op-ed piece in The New York Times about the state of math education in the U.S., Sol Garfunkel and David Mumford contend that "the best way for the United States to compete globally" and to catch up to other countries' students "is to strive for universal quantitative literacy: teaching topics...

August 24, 2011

Lessons of the Earthquake

Washington Post education blogger Valerie Strauss points out that it might be a good time for schools to review—or create, as the case may be—their earthquake-response procedures. Apparently, evacuations didn't go all that smoothly yesterday in some D.C. schools, with at least one teacher ...

August 22, 2011

Teacher Blogosphere Back-to-School Roundup

Just in time to get you motivated (or terrified, depressed, etc.), a sampling from recent teacher blog posts from around the Web: Nick Provenzano, on Edutopia, offers some ice-breaking tips for the first day of school. (Our favorite: "I love to tell an embarrassing story from school.") Middle scho...

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