Greetings, all! This week finds me at one of my favorite places, Edufest in Boise, Idaho. It's a Gifted Education conference that takes place the last week of July each year. It's intense, in-depth, inspiring, interesting, jam-packed, fun, eye-opening, and energizing. (Edufest is patterned after Confratute, which takes place in Storrs, Connecticut, each summer, so those of you who live in the East could consider it an option if Idaho is a bit of a stretch for you.) Essentially, the conference schedule is structured such that instead of attending each session for an hour(-ish) and then moving on to ...


Timed in conjunction with the annual SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted) conference, this week (July 19-25, 2009) is National Parenting Gifted Children Week, an awareness event sponsored by SENG and NAGC (the National Association for Gifted Children). Parenting a gifted child is not the cakewalk others seem to assume it is. Just because your child is smart and (typically) does well in school, it seems others believe that therefore you've got it made as a parent. What trouble could there possibly be with such a worry-free kid? The parents of my gifted students often approach me a little ...


In Gifted Education, twice exceptional (also “2e”) is the term used for those individuals who have dual (or even multiple) exceptionalities. They are both gifted “and” – such as gifted and learning disabled, gifted and bipolar, gifted and physically disabled, gifted and ADHD, etc. This dichotomy of polar exceptionalities can be incredibly frustrating for the individual (and their families and teachers), somewhat akin to being the rope in a tug-of-war – being pulled in one direction by their gifts and talents and the intense desire to pursue them, while also being pulled in another direction by some sort of physical, intellectual, psychological, ...


Hey, kids :o) My name is Tamara and for my job I work with super smart kids like you all day long in every grade level (yup, from Kindergarten all the way through high school). It’s loads of fun and I get to learn a lot, too, right along with my students. They’re interesting people – just like you, I imagine – and they keep me on my toes because – probably like you as well – they’re intense, deeply curious, highly sensitive, sometimes perfectionistic, definitely creative, and often out-of-step learners. As you may have discovered, being gifted isn’t always ...


Well, today was our last day of school for the year, and I am experiencing the screeching halt that comes after the whirlwind which is the end of a school year. I tend to get caught off-guard by the ends of school years, perhaps because I so easily get immersed into the day-to-day joys and challenges of teaching, perhaps because I love what I do so much that I don’t count down, perhaps because I know I can’t possibly “get it all done” in the dwindling number of days remaining and therefore succumb to denial about the year’s...


A few weeks ago I talked about the use of bibliotherapy with gifted students and how I was implementing the strategy with my 5th and 6th graders. Not long after that post, the kids finished reading their selected books and we had discussions on them. The 6th graders also each did a project to answer their questions. (I have less time with my 5th graders, so we only held discussions.) Just for a little quick review, these were the questions I posed to the kids: * Who in the book do you identify with and why? * What situations/events/problems do ...


Yes, I got hooked. If you’re looking for a little summer humor and some fun, brainy entertainment (and aren’t already hooked as I am) check out this summer’s re-runs of CBS’s “The Big Bang Theory.” (I hope they re-run them!) The show is built around Leonard and Sheldon, roommates and research physicists at CalTech. Their always-underfoot pals Raj and Howard also work in labs at CalTech. (Raj has his own apartment and Howard lives with his loud and never-seen mother.) The four of them are happily immersed into their routine lives (Wednesday night is Halo night, ...


"save and save often" but I didn't just lost a whole post :o( thanks to an apparently timed-out connection (this is why I usually type them in Word and then copy/paste, but thought I didn't "need" to this time...) and I have to head to work so I can't re-type it all right now Oh, I'm so bummed! (Tamara pounds her head on her desk...) I'll scramble it back together for you :o) Ah, the wonders and conveniences of technology......


(Although I might be the only person left in the world still using a VCR!) Our high school here is looking into the possibility of using Virtual High School, beginning next school year (if not fall semester, then spring semester). I'm intrigued and excited by the possibilities. It will give our students the opportunity to take courses they otherwise wouldn't have an opportunity to take at our high school. For example, we only offer Spanish language, but next year a student could take French or Mandarin or Russian if they wanted. One complication for Montana students (and maybe other states ...


Well, it's that time of year again! I'm chin-deep in conference-organizing, as our state gifted conference is coming up in a couple of weeks. It's a considerable undertaking, but it is always well worth the effort. Each state has its own process for coordinating their state conference and we here in Montana are in our second year of trying out a new method. Because Montana is geographically gigantic, our conference rotates each year between our five regions so that at least once every five years the conference will be relatively close to home for everyone. (That would be using a ...


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  • Andromeda: I procrastinate because...I'm really kinda lazy? ;) And because historically read more
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