The cost of a bachelor's degree is ever growing, while it's value in the job market continues to diminish; offering students more options and teaching new skills makes good sense academically and economically.


The strongest implications of PISA data are not about American achievement as a whole, but about the adverse effects of poverty on student achievement.


According to scores on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which were released today, American students are lagging behind their global peers in science and math.


This week a whole bunch of my students realized that there is a blog being kept and a book that has been written by someone who happens to look very much like their English teacher, and even has the same name.


Every one in a while, our lives are changed by an event of such sweeping emotional power and intensity that we're left speechless. Maybe it's the ballet Swan Lake. Maybe it's the movie The Notebook. Or maybe it's the Truth Locker.


A source of constant bedevilment for me, and probably for most English teachers these days, is the fact that many kids will tell you they just don't "like" reading.


When I was training, I couldn't wait for the marathon to be over so that I wouldn't feel pressured to work 20-mile runs into my weekend, and then feel guilty if I only made it 17. But it also represented a terrific and unexpected way to bond with my students.


As long as Common Core State Standards and Race to the Top are in place, state departments of education are a veritable cash machine to which test-making corporations like Pearson have all-too-easy access.


Schools labeled as "under-performing" were required by NCLB to set aside a portion of their federal funding to support outside tutoring services for economically disadvantaged students. However, with little to no oversight in how these federal monies were spent, tutoring companies at best failed to help students, and at worst committed outright fraud.


Do students fully understand the dishonesty involved in plagiarism?


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