« The Truth and Beauty of Science | Main | Too Much Freedom of Speech or Too Much Money? »

Remembering Dr. King

| 2 Comments

Across the country people are sharing memories on the 40th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. Some are from the classroom.

Betty Anderson, now the copy editor for the Seattle Times, recalls the less than positive response from her teachers in Alamaogordo, New Mexico when she and a group of junior high students wore black to mourn King’s assassination. “They made little remarks like, ‘We don’t have that kind of problem here, so why are you doing this?” Anderson also remembers when her music teacher canceled her choir’s performances after white parents complained about her kissing a white boy in the school play.

Kathy Callum recalls how things changed at her high school following the assassination. “…We looked at each other not by the content of character, but the color of skin,” Callum tells the Denver Post. Today she is the interim principal at the city’s Martin Luther King Jr. Early College. Early in her tenure, Callum decided to travel to each classroom to read from Dr. King’s writings after some behavioral problems. “I wanted to share some of his wisdom, so they could understand the importance of being at a school named for this very important man.” Says Callum, “…Hopefully, the seed was planted.”

The American Federation of Teachers provides a short history on the labor strike that brought Dr. King to Memphis and the support he received from the AFT and the United Federation of Teachers.

2 Comments

I was a junior at a school in Knoxville Tn whose mascot was a Rebel , Col. someone, and whose principal was Robert E. lEE lOVE.
tHE BLACK STUDENTS WANTED TO STAGE A WALKOUT, AND SOME OF THEM ACTUALLY MADE IT DOWN THE HALLS, WHEN THE VOICE SAID,"ANYONE WHO LEAVES CLASS IS SUSPENDED. pERMANENTLY."
eVERYONE WALKED BACK IN.
oUR SCHOOL WAS A PRISON. wE WERE CLOSE TO BEING BRAINWASHED.i REMEMBER SITTING AND PLANNING THE REVOLUTION TO COME. iT WAS 68, AND i GRADUATED IN '69.

The day that Dr. King was assassinated was the day that our high school that was located in the bad side of town cancelled all classes and brought in the neighborhood preachers to talk to us. That spring was very sad for all the hopeful and aspiring students at our school. We were only 12 percent white; everyone else was either African American or Hispanic. We had hopes and dreams and winning teams; with the death of Dr. King and the June assassination of Robert Kennedy during our graduation week, everything turned for many of us.

Comments are now closed for this post.

Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Maria Sanchez: The day that Dr. King was assassinated was the day read more
  • terry blakely: I was a junior at a school in Knoxville Tn read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here