« Student Faces Grade A Trouble | Main | Freedom to Teach »

Itinerant Kids in Class

| 5 Comments

In low income areas across the country, economic pressures can force parents to house hop and their children to school hop, and Flint, Mich. is no exception. The city loses 1,000 students annually, and half of all students switch schools, according to the The New York Times. In 2004, the State Department of Human Services began an experiment to combat the problem: They would offer a $100-a-month rent subsidy (paid directly to landlords who promise not to raise their rent) for parents at the two most afflicted elementary schools. The Genesee Scholars Program also intended to keep students with the same teacher for 2nd and 3rd grade.

Dr. David Kerbow, a University of Chicago education researcher, has studied the effect of itinerancy on students and their more settled classmates, a problem, he says, education planners don’t always address. “The learning trajectory over time is flattened [for all students],” Kerbow adds, because teachers are often having to play instructional catch up.

Flint’s program has yielded positive results. Participants are moving less and recent data reveals that 3rd graders’ scores jumped on a statewide test.

5 Comments

What a wonderful idea!I've seen bright, wonderful children in my daughters class throughout the years become disenchanted with school because their home life is a wreck. They tend to act out and develop disciplinary problems, which henders their learning experience. What a great start in helping children w/situations out of their control.

Having grown up in Flint and watching the changes in the last 40 years, I have always believed that when the district had to desegregate and bus kids all over the city, they should have looked at a plan that would have kept them at the school they were transferred to regardless of their address in the city. This would have made for a great research project that would have benefitted students.

This is a good idea, but not all families move due to financial reasons. If the state would use that $100 to financially support their "unfunded mandates", I think we would see more of an improvement in scores.

Good article. I've been an educator for 11 years in one of the top 5 poorest counties in the USA. In my third year of teaching I started out with 21 students. During the year that number increased and decreased. The total count of students numbered 31. At year's
end my final enrollment numbered 19, and only half of those students were in my original enrollment. I do not know how the students that left the district fared on their EOG, but the success of my students fell from 91% passing to 74%. I don't know what the answer is, but there has to be a solution

It is a huge concern when we break down the scores from state assessments. The question is how many of the students that are not meeting AYP are also transient students? The state of Michigan has not desegregated that information. It does contribute to the overall success and failure of our students. Especially our special needs population who need a strong foundation, not just in academics, but in relationships. This is an opportunity to study the effects on students' home life. Which plays a major roll in overall success.

Comments are now closed for this post.

Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Danielle H: It is a huge concern when we break down the read more
  • Doug LaFerney: Good article. I've been an educator for 11 years in read more
  • Patricia Even: This is a good idea, but not all families move read more
  • Mary Lavengood: Having grown up in Flint and watching the changes in read more
  • Neva Reaves: What a wonderful idea!I've seen bright, wonderful children in my read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here