A study released today by the Government Accountability Office finds that the pervasive use of violent restraining and secluding techniques by teachers with students who have special needs has led to hundreds of deaths and injuries of American school children in the last twenty years, according to ABC.news. Coinciding with the report’s release is a hearing today at the U.S. House Committee of Education and Labor to determine if the seclusion and restraint of students should be against federal law. Committee chairman Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., called the report "alarming" and "eye opening," in his prepared remarks, ...


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan take note: longer school days and years may not be the key to improving student performance. According to a Miami-Dade County district report, a three-year, $100 million project to extend the school days and school year in the district’s lowest-performing public schools failed to improve student achievement, The Miami Herald reports. The School Improvement Zone, a "pet-project" of former Superintendent Rudy Crew, added an hour to each school day and increased the length of the school year at 39 elementary, middle, and high schools. The project initially earned strong praise in education circles, including ...


"The Story of Stuff," a short environmental-activism cartoon, has been making the rounds on the internet since 2007 and evoking the controversy you’d expect from a video about such a heated topic. The New York Times reported recently that teachers from elementary to high school are using the video as a tool in their classroom to spark conversation about the environment. The video—produced and narrated by activist, independent lecturer, and former Greenpeace employee Annie Leonard—takes an in-depth but accessible look at where our products come from, how they’re procured, how they’re disposed of, and the ...


Authorities in South Korea have launched an aggressive new effort to crack down on bribery of teachers, according to the Los Angeles Times. With parents desperate to give their children any sort of edge in the country's cut-throat college-admissions game, bribes to teachers are apparently commonplace in South Korea. Typically, according to the Times, the payoffs—known as chonji—are provided in cash-filled envelops, but they are also often hidden in candy boxes or other benign-looking packages. To curb the practice, officials are closing many schools this year on Teacher's Day—a national teacher-appreciation day scheduled for later this week—and...


The age-old student practice of slacking off and generally behaving less than angelically toward the end of senior year could have more serious consequences than usual this year, according to an article by two college-admissions experts published in USA Today. Because of the economic downturn, colleges are unsure how many of the incoming freshmen they have admitted will be able to accept their offers, and consequently have been admitting more students than usual, write Robin Mamlet and Christine VanDeVelde, who are working on a book about the admissions process. In the event that schools end up over-enrolled, however, they will ...


Job-hunting educators have long held New York City as an enticing location because of its historically high need for teachers. But, according to The New York Times, a new city-wide policy requiring schools to hire public school teachers internally may leave many otherwise-qualified candidates out in the cold. In an effort to cut costs and avoid teacher layoffs, the city department of education recently ordered principals to hire only internally—including from a pool of teachers “whose jobs have been eliminated and many who have earned unsatisfactory ratings.” Hard-to-staff positions like speech therapy and bilingual special education, schools that opened ...


Our multi-talented and tireless intern Liana Heitin, a former special education teacher, was featured last week in a local news segment on Teacher Appreciation Week. Have a look: Teacher Magazine's Liana Heitin in the News from Education Week on Vimeo. More information on the book The Ultimate Teacher: The Best Experts' Advice for a Noble Profession with Photos and Stories, which includes a couple pieces by Liana, is available here....


If you work with students, you may well have thought, or even said, "This job is driving me crazy!" A 27-minute-long video, produced by the U.K.-based Teachers.tv, and presented by The Guardian, suggests you might be on to something. The lushly produced video presents in-depth interviews with several British teachers who have lost their positions as a result of mental illness. They discuss what led to their diagnoses, and how their lives have changed as a result. One former teacher reports he can no longer "even drive past a primary school" as it makes him physically sick. ...


Researchers at the University of North Carolina may have located an area of the brain that is overdeveloped in children with autism, reports CNN. Using brain imaging, the researchers scanned 50 toddlers with autism and 33 without, and found that the amygdala, which controls the ability to read facial expressions and emotions, was 13 percent larger in children with the developmental condition. "We believe that children with autism have normal-sized brains at birth but at some point, in the latter part of the first year of life, it [the amygdala] begins to grow in kids with autism," said the study’s...


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has over $100 billion at his disposal, more than any previous ed secretary, to bring about significant reform to America’s public schools. In the latest episode of PBS’ NOW, host David Brancaccio talks to Duncan and takes a close look at his record of reform as CEO of Chicago Public Schools to get an idea of the things he might have in store for the U.S. Brancaccio visited one of Duncan’s “turnaround” schools in Chicago’s South Side, Harvard Elementary. The school was in rough shape when Duncan took it over. Of ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Nancy Flanagan: A team of NEA-affiliate consultants: Ellen Holmes (ME), Jim Meadows read more
  • Tisha Rinker: Who was the presenter? read more
  • Susan Morrison: PD several times per week? Gasp! Are teachers to read more
  • Nancy: What a fantastic story! I hope the students are enjoying read more
  • Sclgoya: Education change, like fossil formation (http://www.k5geosource.org/content/dd/fossil/pg1.html (first page only)), can read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here