My favorite part of a whole novel study is the week we hold student-driven discussions of the book. Students have completed reading the whole novel and are eager to share and investigate what they experienced. These inquiry-oriented tips have can also be used with other kinds of texts.


There are two dilemmas I have around the Do Now activity; the first is about silence, and the second is about time. The one simple solution for both problems: reading.


"Remember, the curriculum is everything that happens in the classroom." About a decade later, I had an epiphany about what that means.


Her name was Ms. L'Engel, and she entered my third grade classroom several times to deliver what felt like magic.


For teachers looking to build students' confidence and love of reading, especially in the case of reluctant and struggling readers, short stories may not be a great place to start.


What do you do on the very first day of school and why? Here are my three go-to pieces of advice to kicking off a productive year.


"I am viewing the start of school from an unfamiliar distance. But I want to share what I see as so special about being a K-12 teacher."


English teacher Ariel Sacks shares the secrets that made her 2016-17 school year great—including creating work-life boundaries and taking on new responsibilities—as well as a new shift in her professional life.


In this post, I share some examples of teachers explaining how lack of books impacts their planning, and a checklist and suggestions for administrators who want to build a culture of authentic reading in their schools.


This year, I revived a poetry station which I haven't used in three years: bibliomancy. In it, students ask a question, and use a special process involving books to write a poem prophesying the future. Reading the questions they ask always gives me pangs of compassion for my students, who are in the throes of adolescence. What caught my attention this year, though, was a new category of questions I had not seen before--questions about humankind in general, and its future.


The opinions expressed in Teaching for the Whole Story are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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