Taking risks has become a hallmark of my career and they aren't all winners. Sometimes they flop and I have to be comfortable with that. I must share those failures as well as the successes or else the context is lost. In education, each up hinges on the down that came before it and the more transparent we are about that with our colleagues and students, the richer the learning environments are.


Balance is tremendously hard, even when you realize how important it is. I understand intellectually that I can't do anything else well, if I don't take care of myself, but that doesn't stop me from trying.


The more transparently we examine our practices and make essential changes that support student growth, the better off our future change agents will be.


Virtual Enterprise is evidence that real-world, project-based learning promotes student engagement and quality learning experiences. These practices can be implemented in every classroom, at every level and every content area where appropriate, so long as there is support in place to ensure the successful launch of that implementation.


School must be a place where students feel stimulated and excited about learning new things, experimenting and taking risks that stretch their thinking, not shut down by folks who feel the need to control them and how they think.


These events this week have been the moments that helped me see that change is happening. The relationships are being built and folks are seeing the possibilities. I'm still working to stop saying things like, "when I was in the classroom..." and just listen to teachers and help them find what works for when they are in the classroom with our kids.


The more we offer students learning experiences that ask them to collaborate, consider multiple texts and genres of text and then provide them opportunity to think deeply about the learning, the more connected and meaningful their learning will be.


As education continues to shift, we need to evaluate the long held systems in place. Grading teachers doesn't make them more effective, constant conversations and snapshot observations will. We can only help improve educators if we take the time to get to know them. Admin, know your teachers. What are you waiting for?


Changes in leadership can create discomfort with staff, especially if the prior administrator handled things very differently. Your team needs time to get used to new leadership and expectations. As relationships are being developed, everything is being watched. Every exchange is an opportunity for reflection and growth to become a better leader and develop more connected relationships.


Since being in classrooms is really what will inform my ability to help teachers serve students, I know I have to get into them more in whatever capacity I can, especially beyond observations and walk-throughs, though I acknowledge this is a good start. How do I go about getting off the treadmill and onto the real learning part of leadership?


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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