We must continue to offer students opportunity to take ownership of their learning or they will never learn how to do so. The more we insist on their involvement, the more they will have to get involved.

What's more important: passion or purpose? Nathan Lang suggests we need to be purposeful if we want to make a difference. Read on to learn why.

If class sizes aren't going to be addressed because of bottom lines, either because of a lack of teacher resources or school funding, then we are going to have to find a way to function better inside of these undesirable situations. What's your best tip for working with larger classes and meeting students' needs effectively without burning out? Please share

All students have the right to feel like they have something valuable to offer the world and it's our job to ensure that no test takes that away from them. There is more to each of us than our score on any given exam and we must keep this in perspective. Until we move away from exams completely to other, more effective and meaningful assessment like portfolios and project based learning, students will have to endure the ticking of the clock and the use of number 2 pencils.

Providing feedback is an art and as we continue to propel our students into independence, we need to carefully monitor where they are providing them the necessary steps like training wheels until they are ready to ride alone. The magic is in that moment when they realize that they know how already.

We need to recognize that children have very active lives both in and out of school starting at younger and younger ages now. They play travel sports which helps foster physical skills and team collaborative skills that build stamina and frustration tolerance. They play instruments which develops discipline and a love of music and additional fine motor skills. They join clubs that encourage them to dig deeper into their passions and connect them to what they are learning already in a social environment.

Starting a new job this year has added a bunch of new responsibilities and I'm always worried that I'm not doing enough. Afraid of not pleasing my new bosses and even more scared of feeling like a fraud, I overwork myself, judge myself and then run myself into the ground. The irony is that I know what I should be doing, but sometimes I just can't get out of my own way.

You may hear stories about "super" seniors, those who take longer to graduate than the allotted four years of high school, and think that it's a challenge to work this group of kids, but there is something really special about it too.

Journalism is a discipline that has always supported true creation and application of 21st century skills and does it in a way where students are doing more than they are sitting and getting.

If we just assess students without telling them the purpose and more importantly giving feedback on what we see, then we'd be committing a great injustice to our students. We often talk about actionable feedback to move progress, and consider this best practice as educators... Which begs the question, why would it be any different for teachers?

The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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