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Expand Your Audience, Reciprocity in Action With Triberr

image1(1).PNGIt wasn't too long ago that I didn't get it, so bare with me as I try to explain it in a meaningful and comprehensive way.

Thank goodness for Jim Dougherty who took the time to talk to me on the phone and explain it in a way that made me understand.

Triberr is a sharing platform where users sign up and are either invited to or ask to join tribes of various topics. Within each tribe, users share their blogs through an RSS feed and then through the power of social networks, blog posts are amplified.

Much of my blogging success, I attribute to my participation in various well established tribes of influential bloggers and educational leaders.

It was overwhelming at first because I didn't understand how it works, but now it is a daily commitment that I'm proud to be a part of.

So if you're a beginner blogger who is looking to grow your audience and don't have many followers on Twitter or Facebook yet, but want your voice heard, sign up for Triberr now.

Here's how you do it:

  1. Go to Triberr.com and sign up for a free account. They do have paid level accounts, but like with most services, the beginner level is free and very powerful.
  2. Set up your profile with the RSS feed for you blog or blogs and attach your social media accounts. The more you sign up, the wider your reach.
  3. Browse the list of current tribes in your subject of interest. I searched education and was able to join a few tribes as well as start one of my one. The free membership limits how many people you can add to your tribe, but with up to 25 full members, you can still increase your reach.
  4. You can follow tribes which means you can read and share other people's work or you can become a member which means your blog will be in the tribe stream too.
  5. Join as many tribes as you think are appropriate, but the more you join, the more full your stream will be all of the time.
  6. The tribe stream is where new blog posts come up. As a member of a tribe, you have a responsibility to go through the stream and share content that is appropriate or interesting to your followers. Read blog posts of interest and then click the share button which will automatically share the blog post through your associated social networks.
  7. If you don't feel the content is appropriate or don't like what is shared, you can hide the post and not share it to your network.
  8. Users can leave comments on blogs through Triberr as well and continuous conversation can be shared through the website.
  9. Develop relationships with the other bloggers in your tribe and allow the concept of reciprocity to guide the sharing philosophy. If you share your tribe members work, they too will share yours (usually).
  10. Make sure to check triberr daily or multiple times a day to avoid build up in your stream. It can get overwhelming if you are a member of many tribes.
  11. If you manage your own tribe, make sure that members are participating regularly or you can drop members who don't work out. This way there is always a steady stream of sharing going on.

Triberr is excellent for experienced bloggers or newbies who are looking to expand the reach of their current audience. Being new to the network shouldn't hinder your ability to grow and Twitter chats and Facebook sharing will always be limited to your own network. What Triberr does is put your work in front of social media superstars who can add authority and reach to your voice.

If you're ready to add a megaphone to your blogging, check out Triberr, you won't be sorry. Start networking and sharing with the most influential bloggers in your field.

How do you expand the reach of your voice with your blog? Please share

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