We don't have to work on an island alone. We have an incredible wealth of information that can be shared among colleagues. So how would you handle finding out you were teaching something new? Me, I'd reach out to a colleague who has taught it.


Do you have a hard time saying "no"? Do you struggle with taking on too many commitments? Read on to get some tips on balancing the joy of helping and the necessity personal responsibilities.


What good are standards if students don't understand them? Students need to understand the expectations, in a language that makes sense to them, so why not have them rewrite them?


Do you hate the Common Core or do you hate the tests that are associated with the Common Core? Do you have a hard time separating the two? Too often school stakeholders spend their energy focusing on the wrong issues and therefore never address the actual problem. Do you think it's time for a change?


Have you ever needed to know something, but didn't know where to start? Have you ever wanted to change what you are doing in the classroom, but were short on inspiration? Being connected opens a world of possibilities to educators that make them and their classrooms infinitely more prepared for our current world.


We take ourselves so seriously. It is an important job. But what every teacher needs to remember since day one is that mistakes will be made and the only thing we can hope for is progress. So what will you learn from today?


If success comes from preparation, what goals will you put in place to ensure a measured amount of success this school year? How will you mark those achievements and push harder?


Since learning doesn't stop when school ends, we need to capitalize on our own personal learning over the summer to inspire change in the year to come. How do you apply your summer learning to the new year's plans?


Who holds the power in your classroom? Often the person asking the questions is the person in charge. Why not empower students to ask the questions that suit what they want to know?


The culture we create in our rooms doesn't end with our students. In order to ensure success, we need to get the parents involved. How will you include the parents in your community to foster a culture of learning?


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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