Student learning and inspiration is by far the biggest reason I've returned to teaching each year. Every time I say goodbye to another group of kids, I feel saddened by the loss, but invigorated by their possibilities. Always eager to hear later how things are going, I continue to make myself available despite not seeing them everyday. Technology is great for keeping relationships current.


I have so much gratitude for the amazing educators in my life who help to inform my decisions. The people who listen when I call, who answer my tweets. Thank you. Your experience matters and it makes me better. What have you learned this year that you weren't expecting to learn? Please share


No single test can adequately show what a child knows and can do, therefore by the transitive property no single test can adequately show the impact one teacher has had on that student's learning. Read on to see why student exams shouldn't be used for teacher accountability and effectiveness.


Since school is really about relationships, finishing strong is as much about the content as it is about the personal growth. Let's focus on the positive and try to move forward in our learning experiences from each opportunity presented. Read on to learn about different ways you can help students connect their classroom experiences to summer learning experiences to help end strong or at least go out trying.


The problem has something to do with the artificial way languages are presented in schools. Typically, students spend a period of 40 minutes each day dealing with the second language while all other classes are English only. My teachers also assumed that I had mastered English grammar, which I hadn't.


Shakespeare is often hard for students to engage with, particularly if they aren't reading at grade level. One way to ensure a solid conversation about a complex text is to allow students time to share ideas on Twitter doing a class chat. Read here to see how it turned out for my 10th grade NYC students.


Going "gradeless" hasn't really meant that I have no grades but that I am rethinking what it means to learn in school. Our kids are ready for change and need that change. The more we have them a part of the learning, the better. Read how Jonathan So has shifted his classroom.


Jonathan So shares his experiences of going "gradeless" and offers some insights into his process. Read on to see how he reflected and adjusted his learning to better help students reflect and grow as learners.


As this year winds down, if you have a bad day or you find your patience growing short, give yourself permission to take a time out and if you don't make it there, don't beat yourself up about. Tomorrow is a new day and it's amazing what a little distance can and perspective can heal.


Read guest blogger Sam Williams' experiences with Math Night at Curtis High School in Staten Island, NY. All 21st century learners have choices, but we need to engage them by doing. This group of students build a bridge.


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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