Twitter Moments can be a very powerful curation tool if you are using the social media outlet with staff for professional learning or with students as a backchannel.


As we all struggle to stay engaged in the next week or so, we need to be especially kind to each other. It's easier to be nice than it is to be grumpy and although that is where we may be (which is okay), a smile from a student, colleague or peer can go a long way. So why not be the smile. Say the kind words. Recognize aloud the things you notice and see if you can be the person who makes someone's day, every day.


Every child knows how to like something, but they don't always know how to make it applicable to learning. Sometimes they don't see the connections and that's where we have to help. The more transparent we can make the learning process, the better students will be able to choose when you ask them "What do you want to learn?"


While providing feedback for my students today, I entered an email address as I often do in the commenting function using the + sign and this little box popped up that asked me if I wanted to assign it to the student as a task.


As educators, we need to really make sure our instruction suits the needs of our learners. We can do this best when we know what each of them is actually doing each day. Using tools like GAFE helps to make that available in a variety of ways. Whether through revision history or comments or even peer comments (as in the picture), students are able to work at their own pace and we are then able to adjust appropriately as often as needed.


There are so many truly inspirational and thoughtful pieces of wisdom we learn from characters. We connect to them in their strengths and we something aspirational and in their follies and foibles we see ourselves in their humanity. Literature helps us see the best in the world and the worst and offers us opportunities to discuss it in lieu of politics or current events. With this great wisdom, we must live and not only read so we have great wisdom of our own to share. What's your favorite quote from literature? Please share


Justin Birckbichler is a fourth grade teacher in Stafford, Virginia and a Google for Education Certified Innovator. He is currently battling testicular cancer and has a strong prognosis of being 100% cured (not just in remission). You can follow his journey and help spread awareness at aballsysenseoftumor.com and read a longer version of this story at his educational blog at blog.justinbirckbichler.com. Connect with him directly via Twitter or email.


Although there have been countless other daily risks taken as it pertains to assessment reform and conversations had, the above were the most significant risks I took this year. Since I'm always looking to keep pushing forward, standing on the precipice of success and failure, has become a ledge I'm all too acquainted with. And failure does happen. And that's okay. With each unsuccessful risk comes an opportunity for reflection and continued growth.


Any change worth making take a fair effort of all stakeholders involved, so it is necessary for us to do our best to make sure the message is clear as to why and that lines of communication are open to answer questions that arise. Change is hard and it invokes fear in most people, so we must make sure we do what we can to ease that discomfort.


Remember the children we teach are "whole". We can't always cater to the academic at the peril of other aspects of who they are as people. Consider the social emotional well being of your students and let them reflect on learning already done and prepare for what is to come when they return.


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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