As teachers, our greatest lessons are truly found in what we do and what we give our students permission to do each day in and out of our classrooms - not in what we say or scribble in a plan book late on a Sunday night. In addition, our students often see their classmates through our lens and if Olivia's concern was important to me at that moment, it became even more important to her classmates.


Many students work hard when it comes to doing the things they connect with like playing a sport or learning a musical instrument; even gaming generates opportunities to persist. Candy Crush for example, says you "failed" when you don't complete a level, yet, we don't throw our hands up in the air and never return to the game. We keep playing until we pass and sometimes we even continue to play to surpass an earlier score. However, students don't connect these skills to their learning. We have to make it transparent.


Guest writer, Vivett Dukes shares her response as well as the responses of her students to the election. Read to hear some of her thoughts and consider how to move forward from here.


Living outside the box, has helped me engage countless students into a dance that encourages them out of their own comfort zones and into their own unique skins. First helping them take the labels off, and then placing their reflective glasses on.


We must be mindful in what we ask students to do on their free time and really make sure it's something worth doing. Do we want them to love reading and spend time doing it because the enjoy it or do we want to monitor their every move and determine how they will interact with text?


It isn't just the students who are tossing their pencils down announcing to their parents "I don't get it. My teacher didn't teach this to us." Moms and dads also have homework anxiety, dreading the feeling of not knowing how to help their child with history or math even if they have the time to do so.


#ECET2NY914 will kick off this weekend as a part of the growing trend of regional ECET2 (Elevating and Celebrating Teachers and Teaching) convenings happening all over the country. Participating in events like these is a unique and inspiring experience, but in addition to participating this year, I've been a part of helping to plan the event. Thanks to the awesome leadership of AnnRose Santoro, teachers from around Westchester County, New York City, and Long Island will be able to collaborate as learners and thinkers to help address issues in our own school. What makes ECET2 convenings different than your typical ...


Guest blogger and gifted education teacher, Angela Abend explains why there needs to be gifted education programs in schools.


Changing the world is big job and no one person can do it alone. Always remember that there are people who will help if you reach out. Building those networks for work and family are huge. Who will be your go to person in a pinch if you need help with work? or someone to watch your children when you're stuck in traffic? The people we surround ourselves with are essential to a happy life, so always take time to maintain the important relationships.


In education today, educators are trapped in the muck and mire of red tape that can easily lead to burn out or loss of purpose. It is easy to get wrapped up in all of the things that make teaching untenable and sadly, many do. Because this is the reality of the current educational environment, it is important for educators to focus on what can be done and try their best to live in those moments that connect us to why we decided to teach in the first place. Here's what you can focus on, even when the going gets ...


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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