During this Teacher Appreciation Week (and really every day), we must take the opportunity to say thank you to the folks who have impacted us as teachers and people and continue to inspire us even through the toughest teaching and personal times.


From wizarding prejudices that mimic our real world hierarchies and racial complexities to learning truths about ourselves and others, Rowling explores societal challenges in a way that children and adults can relate to and possibly even start a deeper dialogue about.


At the heart of everything we do, we must be offering students a chance to grow as learners by exploring the world around them in a personally meaningful way. Going deeper than mere test questions is essential to them becoming life long learners.


Learning is a complicated and personal matter, the more control we give to our students, the more ownership they will take. This increases motivation and engagement and allows students to really be a part of their own success.


As we continue to make meaningful change for the benefit of student learning, we must be aware of those folks we rely on to make the learning happen. What can you do in your school to benefit the whole of the community when it comes time to make lasting change? Please share


Since grades are largely arbitrary and subjective, we need to work hard to anchor the communication in facts and have some agreed upon criteria that will reflect the level of mastery each student is achieving.


In this ever-connected world we live in, each of us has to make a concerted effort to balance how we spend our time to not miss out on valuable life experiences that happen in real time, face to face.


Literature can often remind us of the most important lessons in life. If we saw these things happening in front of us, would we take the time to stop what we were teaching to make it clear the lesson to learn? Maybe we need to make these kinds of lessons more visible in every day life.


Sometimes it is easier to focus on what isn't going right, but we must change the script. Let's take some time to acknowledge all of the successes we have had and let go of the failures that have brought us here.


It is through my advocacy to change grading systems and empower students that I hope to leave a lasting legacy that will potentially do more than just impact the students or teachers in my community. The more people read the books, the more I push myself to get out there and have broader conversations with other educators from around the world. What will your legacy look like?


The opinions expressed in Work in Progress are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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