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10 Costly Mistakes Commonly Made By Teaching Candidates

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While the job search seems basic in terms of submitting a resume and cover letter, there are several factors evaluated by administrators during the job search process. As a result, candidates unknowingly make costly mistakes that eliminate them for consideration. As provided by Wisconsin school administrators, below are 10 mistakes routinely made by teaching candidates during the job search.

• Answering questions dishonestly/omitting criminal background violations and misrepresenting certification and licensure qualifications.
• Making one generic cover letter that you submit for all teaching positions.
• Inserting "see resume" when filling out application questions.
• Failing to proofread or update job application materials.
• Using unprofessional email addresses (e.g., [email protected]).
• Going into an interview without first researching the school district(s).
• Submitting resume without including or describing student teaching experience.
• Dressing casual for interviews or career fairs (Dress-for-Success Suit is best option).
• Posting inappropriate information on social media.
• Including academic buzz words without concrete examples/understanding of concepts.
Failing to follow-up with employers after an interview (Send Thank-You Note/Email).

Hopefully you are now more aware of the criteria utilized by school administrators to evaluate teaching candidates and can avoid making these mistakes yourself.

By Joel O'Brien
Marquette University Career Services Center
Milwaukee, WI

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