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Collaborative Teacher Support: "Seeing Is Believing"

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Establishing a culture of teacher support begins and ends with support systems that are designed to promote collaboration and feedback among teachers. One approach that fuels teacher collaboration and feedback is videotaping and discussing lessons. Throughout the school year each teacher videotapes him/herself teaching a lesson, and then shares the video in small focus groups (i.e. PLC's, grade level meetings, content-level meetings). The group watches the video and provides the instructor with feedback (positive feedback and ideas for growth). Although it can be difficult watching yourself teach and/or receive feedback from peers, it gives teachers time to have constructive conversations about the quality of instruction, teacher assignments, and student work. Ultimately, these discussions lead to changes in instructions and student assessment. The feedback received from other teachers, who know the complexities and challenges of teaching, is one of the best ways to improve instruction.

 

What are your thoughts in regards to teacher support as it relates to videotaping and discussion sessions? 

Michael Eskridge, Ed.D.

Executive Director

Advance Innovative Education

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