Guest post by Connie Rath. This post was originally published in the March 21, 2013 TopSchoolJobs eXPO As a prospective teacher, you can distinguish yourself from a competitive applicant pool by understanding your own strengths and how to use them in the classroom to drive student achievement. Here are three ways to use your strengths to secure a teaching position: 1. Evaluate your strengths. A common misconception among prospective teachers is that candidates with the best academic records are the top candidates for teaching positions. However, many of the top teachers -- those who help students achieve gains each year ...


You've been applying, interviewing, hoping and waiting. Finally...you have a job offer! All that hard work has paid off. The district is sending you a contract. What next? The immediate response is to accept the offer and end the job-search agony. Is that wise? Not without careful deliberation and scrutiny. The first rule in accepting positions is to NEVER sign a contract without knowing its parameters. The second rule is to remember what other bloggers have warned: a contract is a binding legal document. Once you sign it, you are obligated to work for that district. Absolutely. No turning ...


It's your life. You'll spend an average of 6-7 hours a day in the classroom - and that doesn't count the endless hours at home devoted to designing lesson plans, grading papers, and creating projects. Deciding where to look for a teaching job is critical - but it can be confusing, scary, and frustrating. Let's face it: you can't all teach where you grew up or where you student-taught. Realistically, you're probably going to have to look at where the openings exist, if you're serious about landing a job in your field. This means that you need to plan ahead. ...


In this competitive teaching market, success is all about separating yourself from the pack. You can't just be a candidate - you have to be the best candidate. A summer job that will complement what you have been learning in the classroom is a great way to increase your value as a job applicant. Summer jobs can be useful in multiple aspects of your job search. Some of those are listed below. Resume: The right job can make your resume "pop" and rise to the top of the applicant pile. It can help you to build a work history that ...


Recent reports predict the demise of the job resume and the rise of Twitter, LinkedIn accounts and video resumes - all in the service of expediency. Employers and job seekers may well be moving in that direction, but at this time, the professional resume is still required in most educational environments. Indeed, technology, such as the Appli-tracks job application system, is incorporated into the recruitment process. Within such systems, however, employers continue to request the professional resume. Consequently, job seekers benefit from focusing on how to make their resumes stand out among the possible 20, 200 or even 1,000 ...


For years, I hit the road with other School District Hiring Directors as we conducted the 'Meet and Greet' Job Fair rotation. These are grueling days of candidates putting their best forward and Directors searching for the best candidates for their schools. In the past few months, I have attended a couple of Job Fairs representing my University as a volunteer, no longer in the frenetic foray of the Director conducting on-the-spot interviews. This has been a wonderful opportunity for me to watch and to learn what makes the difference. From my observer perspective, here are some tips to keep ...


Many pre-service teachers think they need to memorize the 'right answer' to interview questions or participate in many mock interviews. First of all the bad news: there is no 'right' answer. In addition, while the mock interview may help you calm down and feel more confident about an interview, the best preparation is to think deeply about your teaching career. I spent many years as a school district recruiter, and I was never impressed by the rehearsed answers. Interviewers don't look for stock responses to their questions; they look for sincere responses. To best prepare for an interview session, spend ...


Your resume is a very valuable piece of job search realty! Don's skimp on preparing this document. I recommend that you contact your university Career Center for assistance; often you can find resume samples on their websites. There are also free online resume builders that are worth investigating. Here are some general guidelines for education resumes: • Be sure to list your area of licensure endorsement in a prominent place on your resume, preferably at the beginning. Don't make an employer guess what license you hold. • Give specifics about your student teaching experience: diversity of student population? courses you taught? length ...


The time to begin thinking about your career in education is not as you are ordering your cap and gown! You need to be strategic throughout your program to best set yourself up for a successful job search. All college and university Teacher Education Programs require some kind of classroom observations and visits. This typically begins long before student teaching, so take full advantage of these opportunities. Wise teacher recruiters will tell you that your first interview is the first time you meet anyone in a school. Often, teacher candidates make the mistake of staying in their comfort zone: they ...


Skype is the most common way to interview for an international teaching position. It may sound like a relief to be able to interview from the comforts of your own home, but there are a few things you should remember: 1. Dress up. Like with any interview you may have, your interviewer will expect you to look professional. We suggest something conservative and simple. Busy patterns can come across as distracting when you are on a small computer screen. Also, make sure your don't just dress from the waist up. You never know if you might have to stand up ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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