Getting ready to apply for teaching positions? Take the time to perfect your application materials. This includes having multiple people look over your resume, ensuring that your cover letter is error free and well-written, as well as getting your application materials and portfolio in order. If you are getting ready to graduate, your school's career center is a great place for assistance with this. Not in school? Most schools offer career services to their alumni. Focus your job search. Identify a geographic region where you would like to live/work and focus your research on the schools in the area. ...


This blog posting is Part II of a profile of a successful job applicant. See Part I in the previous blog posting. I asked the successful job applicant to share some advice related to the job search, hiring process, and interview. 1. Prepare well. Make sure everything you post online is edited and accurate. If you click "submit" and then realize there are errors in your materials, then you should withdraw your application and resubmit it. However, if the deadline for submitting applications has passed, then you can no longer reapply even if you've already applied. 2. Get organized. Keep ...


This is Part 1 of a two-part blog posting. Recently, I heard from a graduate who landed a Grade 2 general elementary education position. I asked her about her experience with the job search, hiring process, and advice for other job applicants. Here are responses to some of my questions: What was the timeline for the job search and hiring process? Noticed the Grade 1/2 job postings on the teacher recruitment website: June 16 Application due: June 29 Selected for an initial interview: July 19 Initial interview: July 24 Selected for a second interview: July 26 Second interview (lesson): ...


References are people you identify for an employer to contact for opinions about you as a teacher. When you apply for teaching positions, employers typically require job applicants to submit 3-5 names of references and letters of recommendations. Employers expect positive letters of recommendation. However, the content of the letters (or phone conversations with references) often reveals unique personal qualities, knowledge, and skills related to effective teaching that can set you apart from other job applicants. How employers review letters of recommendation During the initial screening phase, letters of recommendation are logged in and viewed briefly by school personnel in ...


Winning a teaching position in today's job market requires tremendous effort, persistence, marketing and strategic thinking. One of the most important things you can do to maximize your chances for success is learning about how employers select job applicants. Find out about the hiring process and what employers value when selecting applicants. The hiring process varies from school to school. Typically, the process begins with initial screening of paper or electronic application materials (e.g., background information, cover letter, transcript, résumé and letters of recommendation). Human resource department representatives quickly review materials to ascertain if applicants are qualified for the ...


A few weeks ago, we looked at Networking, specifically, building your professional network. (Sept. 19 blog posting). Today, we'll review methods for reaching out to your network contacts. Contacting People • By Phone - Write an outline of what you want to say; this will decrease any fears you might have and ensure you communicate effectively and obtain the information you are seeking. Your network will recognize that you are an organized and professional candidate. • By Email - Describe your career goals and ask your contact to assist by sharing your information with school personnel. Additionally, ask your contact to share ...


Recently, a reader asked the following question: "[After being offered a position] ... a couple days later, I was told that the fingerprint/background check came back showing an arrest record from over 30 years ago when I was 18. It was for a felony drug possession and resisting arrest. I was given probation and completed it as required. As a result of this, the school district ... wasn't able to forward and hire me, which I was extremely disappointed." The reader continues to describe a clean record, completion of a baccalaureate and master's degree, state certification, and experience teaching special needs ...


A reader recently asked: "I am about to obtain alternative Elementary certification in Texas, and would like to know about the best prospects for a teaching career. Specifically, which fields are projected to be in most demand in the next 20 years, e.g., Math, Science, Technology, English, Social Studies, etc." Understanding Supply and Demand is important across the United States. While the following information is specific to Texas, the reader's targeted area, the information is transferrable to other states and regions as well. In the State of Texas, there continues to be a shortage of secondary math and science ...


In today's job market, networking is vital to the success of achieving your career goals. Networking can be as formal as attending a networking reception and handing out your business cards, or as informal as talking with a friend's dad at a backyard barbecue. In any case, networking is about effectively communicating who you are, the career path you are pursuing and the skill sets you have to offer a school district. Then, ask your networking contacts to share this information with those who have hiring authority and/or relay news back to you regarding teaching/coaching/leadership opportunities within ...


Whenever you send your resume to a school district to be considered for a teaching, coaching or administrative position you should always include a well-crafted cover letter. Effective cover letters are clear, to the point, and brief. The cover letter should convey information in three to four paragraphs that consist of the opening, the body and the closing. The best way to craft a good cover letter is by working from the job description or job posting announcement, making reference to how you have demonstrated the skills required or knowledge necessary to fulfill the stated responsibilities. A cover letter should ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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