Teaching is one of those professions that attracts a great deal of public scrutiny and in this day and age of social media it is scrutinized even more. If you want to be considered for a teaching position you will need to ensure that you have a positive, pristine online identity. If this issue is at all questionable for you, you will need to take steps to "clean up your digital dirt" or it isn't likely that you will be hired as a teacher. The first thing you should do is Google yourself and evaluate the results. How many are ...


I had a student this past semester whose student teaching experience almost drove her away from wanting to teach. Her cooperating teacher was retiring at the end of the year and had already "checked out" from teaching. She was completely on her own in the classroom. She gave serious thought to not seeking a teaching position at graduation, but after some encouragement from others, finally decided to give it a try. She ended up getting hired at the first job she applied for. Why? She was able to take her bad student teaching experience and put a positive spin on ...


Question from a Reader: "I am looking to move back to the Boston area and having a very difficult time finding a position. I have been working in curriculum and instruction for elementary math and since I left Boston the certifications have changed. Is there any kind of service that can help me with finding an appropriate position. I am finding that many of the jobs I have applied for tell me I'm either over qualified, missing certification, or that the job doesn't really exist." Response: The most foundational issue you need to sort through is certification for the state ...


While we in career services encourage teacher candidates to be willing to move to other states to seek that first professional job, each state requires a teacher to be certified or licensed according to the respective state's policies and procedures. While some states make the process of earning a certificate relatively easy, other states require teacher candidates to navigate through a time-consuming and expensive set of procedures before granting a teaching license. Even understanding the terminology used by each state can be confusing. Some states call it "certification" while others call it "licensure." The first certificate or license a beginning ...


Question from a Reader: What coursework is required in NYS to get certified to teach elementary (particularly 5th and 6th grade) after getting certified to teach adolescent mathematics? Answer: You will want to contact the New York State Education Department: http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/. Because each state department of education handles certification requirements for their respective state, it is important to contact them directly. Also, state certification requirements change frequently--not just related to in-state prepared candidates, but for candidates prepared out-of-state as well. Additionally, if you are currently certified in NY state to teach adolescent mathematics, the representative ...


It always amazes me to hear employers comment on how infrequently they receive notes of thanks following interviews with prospective candidates. According to Katherine Hansen, Ph.D., from Quintessential Careers, only about five percent of job seekers send thank-you notes. This is a critical aspect of the job searching process which provides an opportunity to show professionalism while reinforcing your interest in the position. Common questions I hear from job seekers focus on format and content. Are handwritten notes old-fashioned or in vogue? Should you send an email? If so, when and saying what? While e-mailed 'thank-you's' are becoming more ...


Ask a handful of teachers why they chose the field of education, and you'll quickly hear a variety of personal stories of discovery - the influence of a life-changing teacher they had as a student, a desire to impact the lives of youth through education, and the list goes on. Aside from congruence, or compatibility, between the individual's strengths and interests with the job requirements and workplace environment, what contributes to the long-term professional success and fulfillment of teachers? What distinguishes teachers who burnout professionally from those who overcome adversity and maintain passion for the profession? It just so happens ...


A reader posted the following: "I was recently downsized from a position in a state education department. I had been there 10 years and had hoped to retire (maybe with one more promotion). Now I find myself an older candidate competing for school district jobs with individuals who are currently employed by that district and have been groomed for the position. I am feeling like I have to take a giant step backward and do not have enough time left to work my way back to where I want to be. Do you have any suggestions for me?" Several members ...


A while back, I came across an article in which a recruiter was asked to describe what makes an effective interview performance. Her answer was simple, yet compelling: storytelling. From her perspective, interviewees who can master the art of storytelling make the best interviewees. Consider the most memorable lessons you have learned from teachers, speakers, or mentors. My guess is that what comes to mind for most people involves a personal story. As teachers know best, concepts most often come alive when they are put into meaningful or relevant context. So, what exactly does "storytelling" look like in an interview? ...


As you all know, the education market is very tight right now. Competition is at its highest level--many districts receive hundreds of applications for one opening. What is a candidate to do? How can you stand out from the crowd? At SchoolSpring.com we speak with hundreds of administrators and they tell us what they look for in an applicant's resume. Below is a summary of their do and don'ts. Cover letter: This is the first impression you make with the employer. Make sure it is specifically written for the job you are applying for. Find a way to connect ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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