When applying for teaching positions it is important to remember that all school districts and all teaching positions are not created equal. It isn't just a matter of whether or not they are willing to hire you; it is about finding the right fit between you and the school/position. So, how do you determine "fit"? Here are a few tips to consider: *Does this district/school share your philosophy of education? If you haven't reflected on what your particular philosophy is, now is a great time to do so. It is a given that they will ask you this ...


Although spring is the traditional time for job fairs, fall is grad school fair season. Whether graduate school plans are at the top of your mind or just a thought at this point in your academic career, it is important to consider the benefits of attending your campus or community's upcoming graduate and professional school recruiting events. Graduate school fairs offer an efficient opportunity to meet with a number of universities and programs while making a personal connection with faculty and admission staff beyond an online application. Whether you are just considering grad school or are certain you will attend, ...


In my last blog post, I discussed the importance of starting the academic year strong. However, an overly ambitious start to a job search can sometimes have unintended consequences. Many of the top frustrations job seekers encounter are related to the search process. Technology has changed almost all aspects of employment and hiring, but the changes have not all been positive. First, there are multiple online job databases for multiple schools, districts, states and general searches. Further, the availability of these online resources means that there are more applicants per position. However, increases in applicant numbers are not beneficial for ...


August signals new beginnings--particularly for education professionals. This month may represent the start of a teaching practicum, the final semester of classes, or a recently secured career-level teaching position. Whatever the situation, if you are beginning a new experience this fall, take time to reflect on how you will make the most of the transition and opportunity. As a career advisor, I often ask our new, first-year students to consider how their resumes will look in the senior year, four years beyond their fall orientation. Simply put, the resume of a graduating student will be entirely evolved and contain little ...


Not getting any interviews? Maybe it's your resume. How does yours stack up against the competition? A few things to keep in mind: * Your resume is your marketing tool to get interviews. * Don't underestimate the value of a well-formatted resume! If it is poorly formatted no one is going to read it. So all that great experience and wonderful skills you have may go unnoticed. * A well-formatted resume must also have great content. This is your chance to concisely document your experience, accomplishments, and skills. * The most important information should be in the top third of your resume - and ...


Recently, we received a specific request from a reader in India. The response following the question provides helpful information for all international job seekers. Question from Reader: "How much is an Indian applicant based in India with long teaching / administration experience likely to be accepted in the US system of education? I am 52 years of age with 28 years of teaching / admin experience. Would you recommend I spend time / money on exploring the possibility of getting a senior opening as school administration staff / School Head or something similar?" I would recommend that any educator from outside of the U.S....


Teaching is one of those professions that attracts a great deal of public scrutiny and in this day and age of social media it is scrutinized even more. If you want to be considered for a teaching position you will need to ensure that you have a positive, pristine online identity. If this issue is at all questionable for you, you will need to take steps to "clean up your digital dirt" or it isn't likely that you will be hired as a teacher. The first thing you should do is Google yourself and evaluate the results. How many are ...


I had a student this past semester whose student teaching experience almost drove her away from wanting to teach. Her cooperating teacher was retiring at the end of the year and had already "checked out" from teaching. She was completely on her own in the classroom. She gave serious thought to not seeking a teaching position at graduation, but after some encouragement from others, finally decided to give it a try. She ended up getting hired at the first job she applied for. Why? She was able to take her bad student teaching experience and put a positive spin on ...


Question from a Reader: "I am looking to move back to the Boston area and having a very difficult time finding a position. I have been working in curriculum and instruction for elementary math and since I left Boston the certifications have changed. Is there any kind of service that can help me with finding an appropriate position. I am finding that many of the jobs I have applied for tell me I'm either over qualified, missing certification, or that the job doesn't really exist." Response: The most foundational issue you need to sort through is certification for the state ...


While we in career services encourage teacher candidates to be willing to move to other states to seek that first professional job, each state requires a teacher to be certified or licensed according to the respective state's policies and procedures. While some states make the process of earning a certificate relatively easy, other states require teacher candidates to navigate through a time-consuming and expensive set of procedures before granting a teaching license. Even understanding the terminology used by each state can be confusing. Some states call it "certification" while others call it "licensure." The first certificate or license a beginning ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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