Many times I am asked by out-of-state applicants how to get a job? Here are some tips that might help. •Complete the online application and apply for posted jobs on the school's website. Send a cover letter and a resume (email or hard copy) to the principal. •Do your homework on the school district and the location of the school district. Principals and recruiters will know that you are serious about moving if you have done research and aren't asking questions like, "Where are you located?" or general questions about their school district. •Come out to visit in the spring ...


I frequently have opportunities to participate in panel discussions where several local Human Resources directors are asked to provide insight into the teacher recruitment process. These are typically sponsored by either career centers or education department s of local colleges and universities. There are frequent questions that are asked over and over. One such question is: In the event I am unable to find a teaching position, should I purse my Master's degree? Would that hurt my chances for getting hired? Would I be "too expensive" to be hired? In most large school districts, hiring decisions are made at the ...


Yes, it is true that now is a tough time to be looking for a job. But there are other truths about the job search that will help keep your motivation high and improve your likelihood of employment success in 2012: Hard is not the same as impossible. Remember why you chose education as a profession, and fix your eyes on that goal. Believe that the right job is out there. Job searching should start earlier than you think and will take longer than you think it should. This is especially true for new grads. Building your network and prospecting ...


Sometime in your job search, you will likely have an interview that doesn't take place in person. School districts have been conducting phone interviews for many years, but more and more districts are turning to Skype as a means of interviewing candidates. And while you should prepare as thoroughly for a virtual interview as you do for one that is face-to-face, there are some additional factors to consider when interviewing virtually. Dress the part. Even if the interviewer can't see you, your mindset is affected by your attire. Arrive early. Be ready 10 minutes before the scheduled time. Don't forget ...


Interview success depends on mastering not only what you say with your words, but also what you say with your demeanor and actions. Attitude: Experienced recruiters pick up on attitudes quickly. You don't want to be perceived as arrogant (I'm totally qualified for this job) or disinterested (I'm not all that excited about the prospect of working for you). Show your savvy by matching your demeanor to the context of the interview and the frame of reference of the interviewer. You may not get it 100% right, but your efforts will be noticed and will have a positive benefit. Just ...


Your "personal brand" is your unique promise of value - what those around you expect from you - what you are known for. It includes your credibility, visibility, personality & personal style. It is the MOST effective and innovative strategy you can use to achieve professional success and career satisfaction. It allows you to distinguish yourself from others and demonstrate your value to employers. Your success will depend on the personal brand you create and your ability to nurture and manage that brand. Building your personal brand takes time. Think of brands that are familiar to you (ie, Coke, Apple, Microsoft, ...


This comment, made by a recruiter at a conference I attended a couple of years ago, points to the need for educators to engage in best practices in all aspects of their job search. If you are to stand out in a candidate pool that might number in the hundreds of applicants, you simply must do more than only what is required by the application process. What does initiative look like in the job search? Seek knowledge about the district and school you are applying to. Spend at least 30 minutes browsing the website of the district you are applying ...


More and more employers are using online social networking sites, such as Facebook, as a part of the pre-interview screening process to conduct background checks on job candidates. So, what most students perceive as a students-only sharing of information, often very personal information, is open to more than just students and can easily harm job prospects. How many employers actually look at a candidate's profile? Estimates vary, but it is clear that it is becoming more the norm for those employers who heavily recruit Generation Y. According to CollegeRecuriter.com, 77% of employers use a search engine to uncover information ...


Positive recommendations come from great teaching experiences. Maximize your chances of getting powerful recommendations and increasing your odds of getting the job that you want by doing the following: • Know yourself. What are your strengths? Weaknesses? Areas of progress? • Openly communicate your strengths with your supervising teacher, giving him/her something to look for in your student teaching and the chance to provide you with detailed feedback. • Build a solid mentoring relationship with your supervising teacher. This person will be providing your most important reference or letter of recommendation, carrying a great deal of weight with potential employers. Your student-teaching ...


Last week I met with a few groups of students currently participating in a student teaching experience. After the meetings, during which we engaged in conversation about creating an effective resume; strategically thinking about how to select items to include in their portfolio; and identifying resources for the job search, I began to realize that a central item I'd like to highlight here, in this blog is - sell YOU to the employers you would like to work with. What I mean is that many of you will graduate with similar experience. You will have things like a student teaching ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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