Teacher candidates are wise to consider all the teaching options available to them, particularly in non-traditional classroom environments. One option that is often ignored is teaching in corrections systems. Prisons and jails typically have teaching and training programs for adults and youth. Working in corrections is not on a lot of people's radars, so there's not a lot of competition. Even if it isn't the job of your dreams, the experience alone would be valuable... and impressive on your resume. What's it like working with the incarcerated? In both one-on-one and group sessions, they tend to be like everyone else. ...


When applicants apply for a teaching job, they generally go to the school's website to learn more about the district. While this approach can render some good information, applicants should strive to learn even more about a district. Logical sources are the community's newspaper (either in print or on-line), contact with the state's education association, or the website of the state's Department of Education. All of these would prove to be valuable in providing more depth of information. I would recommend another website that I encourage applicants to use for each school that they are seriously considering for employment--School Data ...


I am hesitant to respond to any career changer before determining that there is ample reason for a change, but that is especially true of my interactions with educators who wish to leave the field. First, I know very well that good, experienced teachers are hard to find and for a variety of reasons are all too often harder to keep. I also know how much time and effort goes into the preparation for this profession, regardless of whether it is a four-year degree program in education or an alternative certification program. So, I hate to dissuade anyone from becoming ...


I was just reviewing the NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) Job Outlook 2011 report and one of the sections caught my eye -- "What Employers Want: Candidate Skills and Qualities". I found it interesting that employers are much more interested in verbal communication skills rather than written skills, ranking it at the top of the list. Following that was strong work ethic, teamwork skills, analytical skills and initiative. Rounding out the top ten list were problem-solving skills, writing skills, interpersonal skills, computer skills, and flexibility/adaptability. What really struck me was that I am currently serving on a ...


A new year, for many of us, signifies renewal or new projects. For me personally, I'll tackle organizing the garage and shedding some unwanted holiday pounds. AAEE bloggers would like to begin this bright new year with an invitation to you. The American Association for Education in Employment has been partnering with Education Week Top School Jobs for over four years now, sharing thoughts about education careers and employment in the field. But rather than just writing about what we think interests you, we are hoping to engage in a meaningful exchange with Career Corner blog readers. We know that ...


Much like the process used by student teachers after teaching a lesson, yearend is a perfect time for reflecting on our performance during the past year. For those of us seeking a career position, this means evaluating how we've been conducting the job search. First we want to review the documents we're submitting to school districts. Have we taken time to research the mission, goals, demographics, and anything else we can learn about the district? Does the cover letter catch the reviewer's interest by demonstrating that knowledge? Has the resume been tailored to fit the specific desired qualifications? Have we ...


Often, when presenting seminars on the teacher job search, I am asked if a newly credentialed teacher should immediately pursue a master's degree. Because the pay scale is higher for teachers who hold a graduate degree, teacher candidates assume that having the graduate degree puts them at a disadvantage. My ambiguous reply to the question is "It depends." Most of the school site and HR officials I have asked tell me that a highly qualified, desirable candidate would not be rejected on the basis of starting salary. However, a master's holder with very limited classroom experience would not rank highly ...


Career Corner received an excellent question from a reader and we wanted to share our expert's response with our readers. "I'm applying to special education teacher positions, and some schools ask for a demonstration lesson as part of the interview process. I understand what a subject teacher might do, but what would a special ed. demo lesson look like?" The lesson would look the same as any other lesson. The lesson would need to identify the following: .The reason for choosing the particular skill chosen. It should note or make reference to the IEP goals and objectives and how it ...


Your Job Search Cup is Half Full - Now is the time to fill it up! 1. You will get a job, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow but you WILL! 2. Come to terms with the fact that your job search for your Plan A (ideal) job may take weeks or months 3. Stay away from: Self Imposed Limitations or Self Doubt or Self Fulfilling Prophecies! 4. Be confident that you are employable 5. Surround yourself with supportive people. If you friends, peers, colleagues are negative about the job search/job market, create some space between you and them. ...


Reader Question: As a retired American teacher, 77 years old, in perfect mental and physical health, I wonder how realistic it would be to start searching for a contractual position on the national and international level. Nationally , it would seem that this ought to be possible given that a retired teacher obviously could be more flexible salary wise, since he or she has already an income, and has already health insurance under medicare. Obviously a retired teacher would have solid experience in his or her subject matter. On the international level, where apparently, there are a greater number of jobs ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • jpaz: Great advice! I appreciate the reminder to focus on areas read more
  • Thanh Hoch: Outstanding post however , I was wondering if you could read more
  • J Kurchner: Thank you for the great article. read more
  • t-pain: I clicked to tweet this but it will not work. read more
  • Alan: Good post, I just IM'd the link to a colleague read more