A few years ago I attended an AAEE (American Association for Employment in Education) national conference. The conference attendees were abuzz over a statement made by a recruiter. The statement was in essence that a teacher is hired because of his or her personality. College and university faculty and career services personnel were very upset. How could someone think that a teacher was hired because of personality? What about the years of training and education? Didn’t those years of education mean anything? After pondering the idea of personality as the reason for hire I came to the following conclusion. ...


A few years ago a student came into my office to discuss his teaching career. He said, “I just finished student teaching. I graduate in two months and I hate teaching. What do I do now?” I was stunned. How did this student get so far in his education without getting experience in the classroom to find out if he would be a good teacher? Was his teacher preparation program so rigid about his in-class studies that they missed the most important part of his education, real time in the public school classroom? How could the teacher education program better ...


I wish that I had a nickel for every time that I have heard these words spoken by a non-traditional age college student as we begin a job search discussion. Education majors seem to be worse than others. Maybe that is due to the fact that the students in our PK-12 system typically range from ages 4-19 and the logical assumption that follows is that the farther from these ages you are, the less effective you will be relating to young students. Some people will even go so far as to assume that “older” teaching candidates may lack the energy ...


I am fairly certain that most prospective teachers and even many first-year educators do not spend much time pondering the topic of tenure. Indeed, aside from possible mention in the introductory courses in education I would daresay tenure is considered germane to the actual training of teachers. I don’t think much about the topic, either, until I come across articles about its eminent demise. These articles appear to be occurring more and more frequently which is why all prospective and current teachers should increase their awareness and knowledge of tenure policies and laws. Whether or not you agree with ...


I really enjoy the opportunity to interact with prospective students at our Admissions functions. One such encounter occurred last Saturday when I spoke with a high school senior (and her parents) who is planning to become an elementary school teacher. Since these chance encounters do not allow time for a deep exploration of the prospective student’s reasons for their choice of majors and careers, I just assumed that her motives were well-analyzed, her chosen field was well-researched and elementary education is an appropriate fit. I then moved quickly to making my points about future marketability in this arena. A ...


Our Teacher Job Fairs have a browsing session in the morning and structured interviews in the afternoon. The interviews are scheduled during the browse portion when school district representatives discover candidates who match their staffing needs and desired professional profiles. As I monitored the afternoon interviewing process on April Fools’ Day it became strikingly apparent that almost all of the students and alumni who had scored afternoon interviews were very professionally dressed and groomed. Now, that may not come as a great surprise to many of you but I have been involved in teacher job fairs for over 20 years ...


For the first time in recent memory, several school districts from a large metropolitan area near our university canceled their attendance at our spring teacher recruitment event – after they had already registered. This occurred in large part because of, you guessed it, a cut in state funding, which is resulting in budget cuts. District budget constraints and reductions adversely affect the job market for new teachers - no secret there. Because districts may not be recruiting actively in as wide a market as previously, the district in which you are most interested in teaching may not be coming or have ...


A thank-you/follow-up letter is the professional way to maintain contact with an employer. This letter will assure the Personnel Office of your continued interest in the position. Remember the purpose of the letter is to maintain contact, but make sure that you have a substantial reason for contacting the employer each time you write, such as: •Thanking the employer for the opportunity to interview (preferably within 24 hours of the interview). •Sending supportive materials, e.g., transcripts. •Notifying the employer of a change of address or additional experience gained since submitting your application. How to Write a Thank-you Note: ...


When I graduated from high school and first began looking for work, I used the only job search method I knew: searching the classified ads in the newspaper. Identifying possible options from those listings, I began submitting applications to employers. I had no idea how few jobs were actually advertised in the paper. Although I eventually landed a position, it was not until much later that I learned the value of networking and utilizing my contacts to locate opportunities. I’ve found a similar job search method being used by the new teachers with whom I work. These candidates are ...


I was recently asked for advice on presenting teaching demonstrations during interviews. I do not consider myself to be an expert in this area, and I hope others will post comments and advice here as well. Let’s open up the discussion! First find out how much time you’ll have to present, your intended audience, and the subject or lesson you’re expected to teach. If you aren’t given the specifics of what or to whom you be teaching, have a variety of options: lecture or small group, and a set of lessons or workshop topics you'd be ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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