I believe the word kids can express a genuine warmth and passion for teaching students. You may feel the same. But if you are interviewing with a professional who feels that word is disrespectful, your opinion will not matter.


No matter what stage of your career you are in, keep your eyes, ears--and heart--open to finding "your person." Why? Because you are called to a profession with quite a daunting task: educating, supporting, and loving the children and youth who are our future.


Today, take ten minutes to create--or better manage--your personal branding campaign. Make this a 3-4 times a week habit and you'll be building a solid, professional reputation in no time. A few ideas to get your started:


I know I owe much of my current classroom success to Louisiana's Believe and Prepare program for providing the support and yearlong residency training that prepared me to be the teacher I am today.


The challenge was great; find teachers who were prepared for a classroom where students came with academic, social and emotional needs. This was a far greater obstacle than I had imagined. The new teachers who we interviewed were naive to the challenges teachers face in a realistic classroom setting: teaching to rigorous academic standards, planning highly effective activities where all students are engaged and challenged, and managing a classroom of students who rely on structures and procedures for their success. Many of those new teachers knew the theory of what it meant to be a highly effective teacher, but the ...


Subbing is be a bridge to full-time employment for many educators. All of us who have ever filled out a standard application with a question about whether or not we'd be willing to substitute have paused to consider the option carefully.


Before you can tackle stress you need to know what is stressing you out.


Determine what RTI information your school would like to present to staff, as well as the degree of faculty input and discussion needed.


Establishing a culture of teacher support begins and ends with support systems that are designed to promote collaboration and feedback among teachers.


School leaders with a negative orientation toward teacher evaluation typically focus on pointing out the negatives they've observed and issuing mandates for improvement or dismissal. On the other hand school leaders who develop a positive orientation toward using teacher evaluation as a teacher support mechanism are making the strides necessary to meet their student achievement goals and teacher satisfaction goals.


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • jpaz: Great advice! I appreciate the reminder to focus on areas read more
  • Thanh Hoch: Outstanding post however , I was wondering if you could read more
  • J Kurchner: Thank you for the great article. read more
  • t-pain: I clicked to tweet this but it will not work. read more
  • Alan: Good post, I just IM'd the link to a colleague read more