We continue to use the term "teacher shortage" to describe the job market in education. Certainly there are considerable shortages in areas such as mathematics, the sciences, special education, and bilingual education. Supply and demand research from the American Association for Employment in Education (AAEE) shows these fields with shortages nationwide. What some of you find, however, is that the words "teacher shortage" do not apply equally across all education disciplines. Those of us who regularly visit with education recruiters hear stories about how many elementary, physical education, and social studies candidates they see. Indeed, AAEE research still shows that ...


Near the end of an interview, candidates will have an opportunity to ask questions. You'll want to be sure your questions demonstrate the depth of your knowledge of the employer and the position. Questions should be prepared in advance while researching the employer but also may be generated by information received during the interview. It's best have several questions in mind before you arrive for the interview. Be prepared but flexible. You may also take this opportunity to communicate a job-related qualification or other important item which had not been previously discussed. A few examples of appropriate questions follow: •What ...


A recent entry asked about the type of questions to expect in an AP interview. You can expect questions around: - curriculum expertise, be able to discuss your teaching success, especially at the grade level of the school you are applying to (i.e. elementary, middle or high school) - leadership training and experience, be able to discuss leadership experience even as a teacher - your vision for the school, what type of culture you would promote - your commitment to the success for all students through your work with staff Your first administrative position will be the most difficult ...


As a teacher recruiter, I am always asked: "What do schools look for in teacher candidates?" Every school would have unique "look fors", however there are some general characteristics. We look for seven characteristics: 1. Talent 2. Interpersonal skills 3. Knowledge 4. Motivators 5. Legal 6. Experience 7. Communication skills The teacher candidate provides insight into many of these factors, sometimes unknowingly. I always stress that the job search process is a job in itself. That process needs to have time devoted to it. The time devoted to research, letter writing, interview preparation and job fair attendance are critical to ...


As a teacher and administrator recuiter, I often get the same questions from inexperienced candidates who are looking fot the "first job". They are sure that they are the most qualified candidates and cannot understand how they are being passed up for interviews. I certainly understand the frustration, but you need to have a lot of patience and self-confidence and continue pursuing every opportunity for a position. The job search process is a job in itself. A candidate must devote a great deal of time and energy doing the research of the school or school district, research the community and ...


M.Smith wrote in about trying to locate states that forgive student loans for new teachers. Jack Kronser (HR director in Colorado) writes: Canceling part or all of your student loans is called Loan Forgiveness and is done so at the state and federal level. It is often circumstantial and typically requires some sort of required service. At the federal level, you might go to: www.staffordloan.com, then look under loan forgiveness. Different states have their own programs as well. Here in Colorado, the program is called LIFT and is available to teachers who teach Math, Science, Special Education ...


Suzette asked for advice regarding a degree and certification in English. Jack Kronser (HR director in Colorado) writes that "from a school district perspective, we find a good supply of English teachers, but we are always looking for excellent teachers in all fields. I would suggest that you have as much content background as possible, as No Child Left Behind has made that a mandate. So, definitely the major in English. Also a minor in a foreign language, Special Education, English as a Second Language, Reading, etc. will make your job search more successful."...


Barbra asked about returning to the US after several years of teaching in Taiwan. Jack Kronser (HR director in Colorado) writes: "Your question is pretty all-encompassing, but I understand your concerns. Yes, being out of the country that long would make you a little out of touch, however, a good teacher is always a good teacher. I would suggest that you start with reading AAEE's Job Search Handbook (www.aaee.org). There are some great tips on what is happening in education relative to job searchers. Subject content-wise, I would suggest that you look at websites, such as the National ...


Barbra also mentioned being "out of the loop of American culture and what is going on in the system." Since you are reading Education Week and Agent K-12, you are obviously online and keeping up with the best source! 1) The use of technology in the job search will be one huge change in the seven years that you have been gone. Especially in urban and suburban school districts you will find that applications are completely online. 2) Online applications will contain pre-interview essay questions to see how you think and feel about teaching. 3) Jobs are listed on school ...


Barbra wrote about being a licensed elementary teacher of 10 years, with a Masters degree and seven years experience in Taiwan. She wanted advice on coming back into the US culture and finding a job. Dawn Jones (Northern IL Univ.) writes: Are you from the Midwest originally? From what institution did you receive your teaching licensure? You may want to begin by contacting that institution to see what job-seeking services it offers to its alumni (resume and cover letter information, access to job openings, interview tips, and job fairs are some common services). Many institutions in the Midwest will offer ...


The opinions expressed in Career Corner are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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