In a previous post, "Staffing, What It Is and Isn't," I discussed the process of finding the right people and bringing them into an organization. An important part of this process is recruitment. (Note that recruitment is different from selection. Recruitment is finding and attracting talent, while selection is just that - picking who you want to hire.) I am often asked by talent managers and other district leaders about using social media to recruit candidates. I believe, if used correctly, social networking can be an effective recruiting tool. Notice the phrase "if used correctly." Jeff Haden's recent article in ...


February 17, 2012. 5:30PM. Long Beach, California. Phones calls made to 911 from an office. Someone has been shot. This wasn't an ordinary business. It was the Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office. And, the shooting wasn't the result of an angry outsider entering the building, but a confrontation between two federal immigration agents. Two supervisors. Two extensively trained, intelligent, experienced ICE professionals. (If you have not heard about this tragic event, here is a link to the Associated Press article.) No one goes to their office expecting a workplace dispute to occur. Let alone an incident that ends in ...


There are many differing views on using social networking platforms in staffing. In my last blog I explored the different parts of the staffing process, from sourcing and recruitment to selection and hiring. Specifically, in this blog we will look at how social media is used (or not used) in selection. As a refresher, selection involves using multiple measures to pick high-quality candidates. These measures could include structured interviews, writing samples, essay questions, résumé review, previous performance, case studies, portfolio grading, knowledge testing, or screening tools like PrincipalInsight, HUMANeX Ventures, and Haberman Star Administrator. While many confuse selection and recruitment, ...


The words recruiting, sourcing, selection, hiring, screening, posting, and staffing are often used interchangeably, but they all have different meanings and represent different parts of the larger staffing process. Even I say staffing at times when I really mean hiring. So what do these terms mean, how are they different, and where do they belong in the process? Here is a breakdown. Sourcing is the act of uncovering the sources of high-potential candidates by reviewing information on current successful employees and unearthing data trends. Think of it as an internal study. For example, a district may research the backgrounds of ...


Last October, I presented at the American Association of School Personnel Administrators (AASPA) conference in Reno, Nevada. After my session concluded, several participants approached me with questions, one of which caught me by surprise. When I was working on my Masters in Labor and Human Resources at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business, many professors advised my classmates and I to sit for the Professional Human Resources exam after we had earned the proper years of experience in the workforce. You can be certified as a PHR, GPHR, or SPHR. What do all of these acronyms stand for? ...


Naima Khandaker, Battelle for Kids Human Capital Specialist, contributed to this post. Naima is a former teacher and current education policy nerd who believes that one day soon, education will be great for all kids. Most school districts across the country operate under a similar organizational structure. The superintendent reports to the local school board, while the various district departments-Evaluation and Accountability, Curriculum and Instruction, Human Resources, Finance, and Operations, among others-are overseen by the superintendent. In many cases, these departments operate independently of one another. As a result, the roll-out of new programs often occurs in a vacuum, which ...


Yesterday, I shared some interesting facts from the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ) October 2011 report, "State of the States: Trends and Early Lessons on Teacher Evaluation and Effectiveness Policies" about the evolution of state educator evaluation systems over the past few years. In particular, we learned that between 2009 and 2011, 33 states changed their teacher evaluation policies. This left me thinking about what has happened with evaluation policy in the other 17 states since NCTQ released their report. After considerable research, I found that there have been some dramatic changes. Here are a few updates: • Hawaii: Hawaii...


Evaluation is by far the hottest topic in education at the moment. Every (and I mean every) conversation I have about schools with a person outside of the education community eventually circles around to how best to gauge the performance of teachers and principals. Likewise, every district talent manager or other education leader I run into wants to discuss the state educator evaluations. Questions like, "What is a good teacher worth?", "How many times should someone be evaluated in a year?", "Should teachers have tenure?", "What types of measures should be used to look at total performance", and "Can we ...


Over the past three years, I've had the pleasure of working, in one way or another, with more than 42 school districts that have received a federal Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) grant. TIF grants are designed to support state level departments of education, districts, charter schools, or non-profit organizations (in partnership with a state, district, or charter) with the design, implementation, evaluation, and continuous improvement of evaluation and strategic compensation systems that identify and reward teachers or principals for developing specific skills, knowledge or abilities; holding leadership roles; exceptional performance; or for working in hard-to-staff subjects or in high-need schools. ...


Last week, Ron Ashkenas wrote a piece on Harvard Business Review called, "Stop Bashing HR," in which he discusses why HR is important and how it can add value to an organization. He begins this article with several quotes from HBR readers who expressed a less than favorable view of HR in response to another blog from Brian Hults of Rubbermaid, "Why HR Really Does Add Value." Here is a sample: "I have yet to see HR add value to any organization." "[HR] is more often an obstacle that needs to be navigated to complete real business processes." "The fact ...


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  • Brian Hansen: Great explanation of the flipped classroom! I'm starting to flip read more
  • Donte Kiryakoza: As usual, another great write up. Keep up the good read more
  • Leoma Dastrup: I don't actually concur with you on this, but still read more
  • Joshua: So, what are the solutions? I often see people decry read more
  • Jules Witherite: Great Job. fantasticread keep up the great work :) read more