July 2009 Archives

Researchers argue in a commentary that investing more money in educational technology and related professional development will not improve student achievement.


'Sexting' and other technology related issues will be covered at the The U.S. Department of Education's national conference on Safe and Drug-Free Schools in Maryland.


A federal appeals court invalidated more than three dozen of the company's patents for online learning-management systems.


A dean at Southern Methodist University in Dallas is urging educators to teach "naked," without technology, to discourage the kind of passive learning he has witnessed among his students.


The U.S. Department of Education released new non-regulatory guidance for the $650 million in federal economic-stimulus funds targeted to the Enhancing Education Through Technology program.


The hot topic of Cellphones as Instructional Tools is covered in a Teacher Magazine webinar and an ongoing online forum. Join in the discussion.


An ed-tech blogger asks "Do most educational games suck?" The post ponders the differences in quality and engagement potential between tech games with an academic purpose and commercial ones intended mainly for entertainment.


A blog discussion between college professors about their dismay over cellphone use in their classes sparks debate about whether the devices are necessary for learning.


There's been quite a bit of tech talk here at edweek.org that readers of this blog may find useful. Yesterday, over at the Curriculum Matters blog, reporter Sean Cavanagh talked about fears that the United States is falling behind other countries in its ability to protect citizens from cyber attacks, which is part of the reason why Tom Luce, a former top education official in the Bush administration, says it's important to bolster math and science education. The essay, which appeared in the Huffington Post, is here and be sure to check back in on Curriculum Matters to share ...


A magazine article details the frightening case of a Wisconsin high school student who allegedly persuaded teenage boys to send nude photos of themselves electronically and then blackmailed them into performing sexual acts.


The conference sessions cover curriculum, assessment, effective ways to use student data, and equipping students for the global workplace. There are also presentations describing innovative school programs in Chicago, Denver, Wichita, and other places.


I wanted to draw your attention to a relatively new initiative from the Consortium for School Networking, Web 2.0 in Schools: Policy & Leadership. An advisory committee was formed last year in July, but it seems like most of the work they've done has been pretty recen. This report, for example, released in May 2009, talks about what the administrator's role is in navigating the education opportunities of Web 2.0 tools with keeping students safe online. Based on a survey of about 1,200 district administrators, the report found that nearly three-quarters thought that Web 2.0 tools—such ...


The board for the Miami-Dade County school district approved a plan today to educate students about the legal and safety issues related to “sexting,” the recent craze among adolescents of sharing nude or sexually provocative photos over cellphones.


A new series of Webinars from the International Association for K-12 Online Learning provides a how-to on building virtual school programs.


Congress has ordered a Federal Communications Commission review of BusRadio amid complaints that the service is sometimes age inappropriate and that the students are being forced to listen to the commercials played on the station.


The maintenance and professional development costs associated with the effective use of educational technology are often overlooked when calculating the costs of putting the tools into classrooms.


A Virginia school administrator was awarded legal fees from his school board after child pornography charges were dropped against him following his investigation of a student sexting incident.


Experts in the field are hoping the pick is someone with a passion for the potential of educational technologies, of course, but who can also leverage some influence in making ed tech a policy priority with some real money behind it.


You may remember a year or so back in Chicago, there was talk of opening a brick-and-mortar school that would specifically be designed for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning students. Those plans never came to fruition, but it looks like the concept has moved instead to the online arena. The GLBTQ Online High School is currently accepting applications for the 2010 school year. The private, nonprofit online school, based near St. Paul, Minn., will serve students across the nation, as well as worldwide, on both a part-time and full-time basis. The school is committed to creating a safe, affirming ...


It is clear from the growing presence of open-source technologies at conferences such as NECC and in the education press that these alternatives have reached a level of maturity at which they can be credibly considered, especially given the budgetary constraints so prevalent today.


Erin Gruwell's inspiring keynote, which marked the end of this year's NECC, illustrated the importance of making learning relevant to students and using tools, like education technology, to help students achieve.


The debate about 1-to-1 computing programs at one of the last sessions at NECC was not so much about whether the initiatives are necessary or not, but rather, what kinds of mobile devices should be used for such programs.


School administrators should ask several important questions before deciding whether to create their own online professional development programs or purchase them off the shelf, an online professional development expert told the audience at this NECC session.


A caravan of buses dropped a large group of ed-tech advocates off on Capitol Hill well-prepared to educate lawmakers on the challenges they face in trying to integrate technology and make learning more relevant and engaging for today's digital natives.


The first blind person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest shares the connection between his journey and how teachers can inspire students to take on challenges in the classroom.


Our intern and guest blogger, Tim Ebner, has this report: The historic Library of Congress proved an apropos site for a field trip for the educators attending the National Educational Computing Conference here in Washington. The Library of Congress is the largest public repository of its kind in the world, home to 140 million materials, which include books, videos, and artifacts. Visitors at a reception last night had open access to tour the library, renowned for its architectural beauty and priceless collection, and learn about its newest Web resource—a project called Teaching With Primary Sources Direct. The free online...


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