May 2013 Archives

Attendees at a conference on "reimagining education," emphasized blending the use of technology with other subjects, including the arts.


Romanian high school student Ionut Budisteanu won this year's Intel International Science and Engineering Fair by making Google's self-driving car $70,000 cheaper.


Coursera announces a new partnership with universitiies to offer "MOOCs," a plan that draws a positive reaction from Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.


A group designing tests to go with the common-core online assessments has released practice tests for students, teachers, and parents.


Dallas' schools chief has asked for the resignation of his chief of staff, who has confirmed he is the subject of a federal investigation.


Microsoft is ending support for Windows XP, believed to be the most widely used operating systems in K-12 districts, leaving districts to upgrade or choose other options.


Schools are awash in data, but their tech systems lack "interoperability," or the ability to work together, a new report concludes.


The Helmsley Charitable Trust will provide $2.2 million to Khan Academy, known for providing online instructional videos, to develop content and tools to meet the common core math standards.


Coursera is partnering with museums, not just teacher colleges, in a new effort to provide teacher professional development through "massively open online courses."


Brandt Redd, formerly of the Gates foundation, has been named chief technology officer at the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.


Complaints are rising that the E-rate is failing to meet schools' technology needs, but will possibled funding solutions gather the necessary support?


Students at East Side Middle School in New York City observe and conduct experiments on elephants in Thailand via online video chatting.


A group of education organizations offers a "toolkit" of resources for helping K-12 teachers and administrators use data wisely.


A Florida measure awaiting Gov. Rick Scott's signature would open the door to more online providers, including MOOCs.


Education Week is hosting a webinar on Tuesday, May 14 at 2 p.m. Eastern, on universities creating programs in K-12 entrepreneurship.


Maine officials have selected Hewlett-Packard as a prefered vendor to provide computer techology to students, though schools will also be given the ability to choose other technology, including Apple.


Coursera's efforts to bring "MOOCs," massively open online courses, to teacher education will begin with 28 courses.


A survey released by Gallup finds that only a fraction of college presidents believe "massively open online courses" will improve student learning or solve financial problems.


Parents see the potential in mobile apps for learning, but find that children tend to use them purely for entertainment, a nationwide survey finds.


Coursera, a major name in providing "massively open online courses," takes a step into K-12 schools by arranging to provide teacher training.


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