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New York Times Offers Digital Subscription to Schools

The New York Times is making its digital offerings available for school-wide access through a new subscription service.

Dubbed "In-School Access," the subscription will cost schools $780 a year or more, depending on enrollment and faculty size. It will allow full access to NYTimes.com and the Times' archives from 1851-1922 and 1981-present. The subscription will apply to any device with an Interent protocol address assigned to the school's network.

"K-12 teachers and students have used The New York Times newspaper in classrooms for years," said Yasmin Namini, the organization's senior vice president and chief consumer officer, in a statement. "With this new in-school offering available at affordable rates, schools can access even more news, opinion and analysis from The New York Times on any device, in addition to the award-winning video, photography and infographics only available on NYTimes.com."

For interested teachers, the standards for using the digital resources will be the same as for using newspaper content, said a Times spokeswoman in an email. If the materials are used in a standard educational setting—e.g., shared with students as a part of a lesson plan—educators will be considered exempt from copyright laws.

About 25 schools are currently participating, the spokeswoman said.


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