December 2014 Archives

Google scanning student emails, inBloom collapsing, and the California legislature passing a major data-privacy measure were among the top data-privacy stories of 2014.


President Barack Obama touted the benefits of educational technology often last year, but how much influence has he actually had on moving digital learning forward?


Guests Holly Clark and Kyle Pace debated Chromebooks versus iPads in an #EWedchat this week. Chat participants discussed the pros and cons of each device and shared resources for educators.


A new guide for superintendents can help school districts through the network upgrade process to bring faster Internet access to students.


In December 2008, President-elect Barack Obama vowed to improve broadband and technology access for U.S. schoolchildren, among other ed-tech priorities.


Next Generation Learning Challenges and Education Cities are partnering to support 10 "emerging harbormasters" to support system-wide growth of personalized learning.


A new "occupational skills profile" for big-data specialists outlines the relevant knowledge that professionals say is not being provided in K-12.


A recent Education Week story about the push for digital-content interoperability standards in K-12 prompted an outpouring of reaction from readers who believe it's an issue to watch in 2015.


We'll debate iPads versus Chromebooks for education in a Twitter chat on Wednesday from 8 to 9 p.m. Eastern Time. Join us using the hashtag #EWedchat.


Online testing environments, adaptive technologies, and new digital platforms hold the potential to transform K-12 assessment and further personalize learning, says a new Pearson report.


Reaction to the newly approved funding increase for the federal E-rate program has been mostly positive.


The U.S. Department of Labor will award 25 grants totaling $100 million to public-private partnerships that develop registered apprenticeship programs.


Funding for the E-rate, a federal program that supports technology in schools, will rise about 60 percent under a plan approved by the FCC today.


The FCC will consider a proposal Thursday to raise E-rate funding from $2.4 billion to $3.9 billion a year.


Education Week is hosting a webinar, "Personalized Learning: Turning Lofty Aspirations Into Specific District Policy," on Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. eastern.


Code.org and the National Science Foundation have forged a public-private partnership that will use $20 million in new funding to expand computer science education in U.S. schools.


Students using the blended learning math program Teach to One: Math, which adapts to students' instructional needs daily, increased their math skills significantly over national norms.


More than one million Chromebooks were sold in the U.S. K-12 education market during the third quarter of this year, accounting for 35 percent of all devices sold to schools.


About 60 percent of job openings require basic science, technology, engineering, and math literacy, and 42 percent require advanced STEM skills, according to a new survey of 126 chief executive officers.


LAUSD officials originally planned for all 900-plus city schools to receive iPads by the end of 2014, but the latest setback means just 79 schools will have devices this school year.


Philadelphia's expansion and creation of technology-rich, hands-on high schools were the focus of two segments this week on PBS NewsHour.


Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Ramon C. Cortines confirmed that the FBI took 20 boxes of evidence related to the district's ambitious 1-to-1 computing initiative.


The justices take up a case that includes a Facebook reference to shooting up a school. Was it a true threat, or a "therapeutic" vent?


Poor Internet connectivity in rural areas and the potential loss of federal funds have some worried about new e-learning plans in Kentucky and Pennsylvania.


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