March 2015 Archives

A new state report uncovers serious functionality and management issues in implementing Pearson's learning management system, Schoolnet, in Idaho.


States are rapidly moving forward with new assessments, many of which are being given online, and many of which are focused on the transition from gauging preparation for higher education.


Despite fragmented beats and limited time, education reporters are paying increased attention to technology issues in schools, say both outside observers and journalists themselves.


The Internet's effects on education, economics, and personal relationships are seen as largely positive by people in non-highly industrialized countries.


In 2013, just 26 percent of computing professionals and 12 percent of working engineers were women, according to a new report.


A proposed bill that would establish a new baseline for federal involvement in protecting student-data privacy will undergo further revision before being formally introduced.


In the wake of a judge's ruling that voided the state's contract with broadband providers, Idaho Department of Administration Director Teresa Luna resigns.


An examination of ed-tech use in prestigious private schools prompts a big question: Would public school educators prefer abundant resources, or no standardized tests?


Ed-tech vendors took a hard look at new digital-content 'interoperability' standards touted by the Houston school district during the annual CoSN conference.


More than 80 percent of college students are now using mobile devices to study, and the growth in the use of those devices is shaping where and when postsecondary enrollees do academic work, a new survey from McGraw-Hill Education and Hanover Research finds.


Requests for E-rate funds could hit $5.1 billion this year, in part thanks to new funding for internal wireless connections.


Assessment readiness is the number-one priority for K-12 ed-tech leaders, but fewer than 30 percent report being ready for new online exams.


Women in K-12 information-technology leadership positions continue to face a pay- and prestige-gap, according to new survey information.


A New Jersey school administrator voiced concerns about the state and a test vendor apparently monitoring a student's social media to look for evidence that standardized test information had been improperly shared.


A new white paper from Center for Promise explores the experiences of several districts implementing educational technology, and the lessons that can be applied to other K-12 systems.


A nonprofit organization is asking for information from K-12 districts and ed-tech vendors about the benefits and drawbacks of "pilot tryouts" of products.


Clever has revised its privacy policy to promote greater transparency and more stringent handling of student data during "corporate events" such as mergers.


More than 30 groups representing school officials and educational data-use proponents have signed on to new principles related to student data.


State education and law enforcement officials say an investigation will begin to identify the origin of the attacks and the culprits behind them.


Idaho lawmakers allocated new money for school broadband access, ensuring districts have continued Internet access following a court ruling last year which voided the statewide broadband contract.


Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart said Wednesday that online testing was going smoothly, after two days of sporadic disruptions around the state.


A new report questions the academic performance and financial accountability of the California Virtual Academies, though the online provider and its parent company dispute the findings.


Teacher bias influenced Israeli girls' performance in STEM subjects and their decision to pursue further studies in the subject, according to researchers.


A number of major Florida districts continued to suspend online testing after a series of breakdowns that disrupted the administration of writing exams.


Eleven "highly innovative" principals told U.S. Education Department officials about leadership, dealing with state tests, and their efforts to go to scale.


Some of Florida's largest school districts experienced problems administering a statewide online writing exam on Monday.


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