January 2020 Archives

Schools around the country are contending with damage from the latest social media craze, which involves using a phone charger and a penny to spark an electrical outlet.


A new report estimates that 20 to 40 percent of the tasks teachers spend time on, including grading, lesson planning, general administration, could be outsourced to technology.


Several incidents have popped up across the country in recent years: fake district accounts in Arkansas, California, Minnesota, and Ohio, and fake superintendent accounts in Delaware, Massachusetts, and New Jersey, among others.


Researchers at the Reboot Foundation found that interventions as simple as reading a short article or watching a three-and-a-half-minute long educational video can make an immediate difference in students' abilities to pick out fake news.


The champion of disruptive innovation in business and education passed away this month. One of Christensen's co-authors of "Disrupting Class," Michael B. Horn, assesses the impact his late colleague had on schools.


The digital world isn't just exhausting for adults. More than half of the middle and high school students who participated in a recent survey say they sometimes turn off their phones just to get some relief from all the activity.


An expert recommends schools agree not to pay tech providers until their products prove effective.


The director of teaching and learning for a Minnesota district talks about putting e-learning days into action under difficult circumstances.


More than a third of the nearly 300 college admissions officers surveyed by the Kaplan Test Prep company say they have visited sites like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to get more information about a prospective student.


Older children would be protected by the same online privacy laws that apply to younger kids, under a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives this week.


A new law in California strengthens privacy protections for consumers, including children under 16, but leaves open some questions for K-12 educators.


A New York State school district has announced it will begin using controversial facial recognition software for school safety purposes, over the strenuous objections of civil liberties advocates.


Internet connectivity, recruiting staff, and finding partners to learn from are all big challenges for an ed-tech leader in a district off the coast of Alaska.


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