August 2009 Archives

Hundreds of good questions showcase just how difficult it is try to apply one set of criteria to 50 different states.


The deadline for comments on the Race to the Top guidance is rapidly approaching, so hurry up and get your critiques in. Then, if you haven't already, be sure to read my colleague Steve Sawchuk's story on NEA's comments. And, (almost) hot off the presses, four education redesign-oriented groups have teamed up on a list of Race to the Top comments. They include the Center for American Progress, Democrats for Education Reform, the Ed Trust, and the Education Equality Project. The groups recommend, among other ideas, that the Department of Education: *Ask states how K-12 dollars are distributed, not just ...


Everyone agrees that it will be a long time before there's another Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions chairman like the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass. Folks described him as a passionate advocate for disadvantaged kids and marveled at his ability to bring disparate groups around the table. Still, the committee has a lot of business to tackle, including the reauthorizations of the No Child Left Behind Act and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act. Someone will have to shepherd those measures through, and we'll likely find out who that will be soon. The smart money says it will ...


Proposed regulations for Title I school improvement grants would require districts to adopt one of four reform models.


It may be much harder to find common ground on education with the death of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.


...all at the same time? Not really....


If you're enough of an education policy geek to read this blog regularly, you probably remember the Aspen Commission on the Future of No Child Left Behind, which ramped up in 2006 and was charged with devising a bipartisan set of recommendations for improving the law. At the helm were two former governors, Tommy Thompson, a Republican from Wisconsin, and Roy Barnes, a Democrat from Georgia. And leading the staff was Alex Nock, who is now a top aide for Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. Recommendations included providing states with incentives for ...


The Education Department will be posting an open letter seeking Race to the Top peer reviewers within days.


If the competition for a slice of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top Fund were a K-12 class, Colorado would be the kid in front, furiously taking notes, and leaping up to answer every question.


Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Republican, is calling a special session so that the state can get a slice of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top grant money. He wants to address the state's data firewall.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan outlined some specifics on just how that $650 million in "innovation" money made available under the stimulus will be doled out.


Hungry for more details on the most-watched slice of the stimulus? You're in luck. Edweek.org is holding a webinar tomorrow at 2 p.m. on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and, in particular, the $4.35 billion Race to the Top Fund grant program. Guests will include Joanne Weiss, Race to the Top director at the U.S. Department of Education, and Susan A. Gendron, Maine’s commissioner of education and board president of the Council of Chief State School Officers. Politics K-12's own Michele McNeil will be moderating. You can preregister and watch it live. And if ...


The chancellor of the D.C. public school system makes ,O magazine's "Power List" as one of Washington's most controversial but effective leaders.


Duncan told a rural town hall that the issue of recruiting and retaining good leaders is not 'unique to rural communities.'


States will get to keep at least $200,000 to help administer Title I and special education programs.


If you were in Minnesota for the Republican convention last year or in D.C, during the inauguration you may have been lucky enough to catch the Al and Newt Education Equality Project Show. In case you missed it, it basically involves Rev. Al Sharpton and former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich high-fiving and fist-bumping and telling everyone about how their similarities on education policy transcend their differences on... just about everything else. They're pro-charter, pro-merit pay, pro-accountability, and they play well with all sorts of audiences. At the convention, a room full of conservative Republican delegates gave Sharpton a ...


So this week, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, a former big city superintendent, is headed up to Alaska as part of a cabinet-level push to connect with rural states. The tour has been going on all summer, but the Last Frontier is Duncan's first stop. The trip is part of a larger effort to reach out to rural America, but the education emphasis may be coming just in time to soothe some friction between rural schools and the administration. For instance, on a call last week, one rural official said he thought the competitive grant programs created under the economic ...


These states will get up to $250,000 each to hire consultants to help them complete their applications.


Detroit Public Schools' teacher union president raises the idea that his district needs to protect any education reforms that stem from its state financial takeover from being changed by future district leaders. Can the same idea be applied to stimulus reforms?


It's going to take 642 hours for each state to complete the applications, the Education Department estimates.


Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has taken on a new gig, as the executive vice-president of the National Chamber Foundation, a non-profit arm of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber has been really active on education issues for a long time, and its views tend to dovetail pretty well with Spellings'; the group has been very supportive of accountability through testing, for instance. Apparently, Spellings started serving as a senior adviser to the Chamber back in April, even as she was working as the president and CEO of Margaret Spellings and Company, a public policy ...


You would be hard-pressed to find this important group mentioned in Education Department's proposed criteria.


Jim Shelton, the Education Department's assistant deputy secretary for innovation and improvement, who will be spearheading the process for doling out $650 million in Investing in Innovation grants to be made available under the economic-stimulus package, gave state and local officials a clearer picture of what he's looking for on a conference call today. The official word on the Innovation grants isn't available yet. But Shelton, in a call with other top Education Department officials, said the department would be looking at student graduation, student matriculation, and student achievement in doling out the grants. And he said the department also ...


The Chicago Board of Education has been subpoenaed in a federal investigation...but ex-CPS chief Arne Duncan has not.


California Attorney General Jerry Brown is expected to weigh in on the dispute over California's "fire wall" restricting the use of student achievement data in teacher evaluations.


Now that U.S. Department of Education has made it clear that states must tear down their data firewalls in order to get a piece of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top fund, do you think California and New York will change their laws to be eligible?Yes, both will No, neither of them willPossibly one or the other willNo, they don't really need to because New York's law sunsets in 2010, and California's districts can still link teacher-and-student data, even if the state can'tugg boots uk...


...doesn't mean states and school districts will spend their money faster. The U.S. Department of Education announced today that it is releasing nearly $11.4 billion in Title I, special education, and vocational rehabilitation funding a month early to "help save jobs and drive reform," according to a press release. Rather than getting these stimulus funds at the end of September, states and school districts will have access to the money around Sept. 1. But as we've written before, states have been slow to draw down their allocations. As of July 24, states had only drawn down about 22 ...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments