December 2010 Archives

The list includes Race to the Top winners, ESEA reauthorization on hold, abolishing the Education Department, the split in the Democratic party, and more.


Giving districts wiggle room on No Child Left Behind's requirements would hurt the chances for reauthorization and just generally create a messy renewal process, according to a survey of Beltway Insiders and other edu-smarty-pants


Under the new Republican majority, the panel also is going back to its previous name, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce


It will be up to the new, more fiscally conservative Congress to decide if if President Obama's signature education reform program will be extended.


A new, more conservative Congress will get to set 2011 spending levels for K-12 programs.


Schools would be required to conduct comprehensive background checks for any employee using state criminal and child abuse registries and the FBI's fingerprint database, under a bill that the U.S. House of Representatives is considering today.


The buzz is that education could get a much more prominent role than usual in the president's State of the Union address early next year. And lawmakers want to be ready.


Federal education programs will be frozen until March 4 under a budget deal up for a vote this week, and next year a new, more conservative Congress will set spending levels for K-12.


Senate leaders' decision to stop action on a big giant spending bill could spell flat funding for most federal programs, including Title I and special education, until a new Congress is in place.


The Teacher Incentive Fund and the School Improvement Grant program would see some tweaks under the giant spending bill under consideration in the Senate.


Survey data shows that the stop-gap efforts couldn't stave off cuts forever. Now that federal dollars are drying up, districts are still facing shaky revenues.


The Senate's version of a spending bill for fiscal year 2011 includes some surprising increases for education and goes beyond what the House of Representatives is considering.


Instead of having the new round of grants go to individual states, state schools chiefs want states to be able to collaborate together on grant applications.


New numbers from the Department of Education show that only 53 percent of the schools receiving SIG money are urban, while 23 percent are rural, and 24 percent are suburban.


Leaders in the Democratic-for-now House of Representatives have included $550 million to extend the Race to the Top program in a big, giant spending bill that finances most government programs at last year's levels until Sept. 30.


As lawmakers struggle to complete some sort of spending plan, the administration is pushing lawmakers for another year of Race to the Top.


The U.S. Department of Education will give states feedback on their Race to the Top plans by December 10.


In a speech to state lawmakers and education leaders, the education secretary offered a glimpse into his thoughts for the future.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Dennis Van Roekel, the president of the NEA, are holding an event today at a middle school in Prince George's County, Maryland, that is trying out one of the four, controversial school improvement models spelled out in the regulations for the School Improvement Grants. On the surface, this seemed like one more photo-op to dispel the notion that the administration is locking heads with unions over education redesign efforts. That seems to be a big public relations push for both the unions and department right now, culminating in a big Union Collaboration ...


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